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    tiruvAcagam or Sacred Utterances
    of the Tamil Poet, Saint and Sage MAnikka-vACagar
    by Rev.G.U.Pope
    Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1900
    (part II - Hymns 11 -51)

    Metre : Naladittaravu koccuk kalippA

    Arunachalam.- The name of Rudra is scarcely ever applied to Civan in the south, yet it would seem
    as if the idea of Civan had been mainly developed from the Vedic Rudra, the god of Storms, the father
    of the Maruts, of whom so many stories are told which now are the accepted legends of Civan. It may
    safely be said indeed that all the Vedic Rudras acts and attributes are given in the modern Caiva system
    to Civan. One of these is connected with the legend of Arunachalam, so often referred to in Tamil Caiva
    poetry. According to the legend contained in the Linga Puranam, it is related that Brahma and Vishnu
    disputed regarding their respective claims to superiority, and thence a terrific fight arose. At this time
    to quiet their contention, Civan, or Mahadeva, appeared as luminous lingam, a pillar of fire, equal to
    a hundred final mundane configurations, without beginning, middle or end, incomparable, indescrible,
    undefinable. Hari determined to examine the source of this fiery appearance, and took the shape of a
    boar whose description is very wonderful. Speeding downwards for a thousand years he beheld no base
    at all of the lingam. Meanwhile Brahma took the form of a swan purely white and fiery eyed, with wings
    on every side, rapid as thought, and went upwards to see the lingamstop; but both failed, and at length
    united in a hymn of praise to Civan as supreme; which so pleased the god that he offered them a boon.
    They asked that they might both obtain an eternal devotion for him, which was granted. Thenceforward
    the worship of the lingamhas been inaugurated in the worlds. The pedestal is Mahadevi, and the
    lingamitself is the visible Mahecvara.

    I. Civan as a Guru.

    Mals self went forth a boar; but failed His sacred Foot
    To find, that we His form might know, a Sage He came,
    And made me His! To Him, Who hath nor name, nor form,
    A thousand sacred names SING WE, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (4)

    II. I saw Him; thenceforward my soul worships Him unseen.

    The Lord in Perun-turrais ever-hallowed shrine
    Who dwelt, my birth with all its germs destroyed; since when
    Ive none else; formless is He,- a form He wears,
    The Lord of blest Arur SING WE, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (8)

    III.

    To Hari and to Brahma and to other gods
    Not manifested, Civan came in presence there,
    Melted our hearts, received our service due; that all
    The world may hear, and smile, SING WE, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (12)

    IV.

    From sinking in the vain abyss of worthless gods,-
    From births illusions all,- the LIGHT SUPERNAL saved
    And made me His. Soon as the new, pure Light, was given
    How I in Bliss was lost: SING WE, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (16)

    V.

    To wildered gods, to Ayan, and to Mal unknown,
    Civan assumed a form, that men on earth should joy.
    That germs of birth consumed might die, with gracious glance,
    How to my soul He came, SING WE, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (20)

    VI.

    The Lord, Who shakes the serpent dancing round His waist,
    With His Hill-partner, came to earth, made us His own;-
    Say thus, soul-lighted, eyes like full bright lotus flowers,
    Pouring forth floods of tears, and SINGING, BEAT TELLENAM! (24)

    VII.

    Civan unknown to Hari, Ayan, heavenly ones,
    On earth drew even me; come, come, said He, and made me His!
    When imprint of His flowry Feet was on my head impressed,
    How grace divine was mine, SING WE, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (28)

    VIII.

    Like rustling palm-leaves is this frame! Its births and deaths,
    With dread of good and ill, He swept away, and made me His;
    He gave me grace, though I, all else forget, neer to forget
    His Foot; Whose mighty dance SING WE, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (32)

    IX.
    As though some stone were made sweet fruit, the Lord in grace
    Gave evn to me His golden Foot, and made me His.
    O ye with slender waist, red lips, and winsome smiles!
    Lord of the Southern-Land, call Him; AND BEAT TELLENAM! (36)

    X.

    Even in a dream His jewelled Feet tis hard for gods to see,-
    With Her like laurel tree with jewelled arms,-entering in grace,
    In waking hour He took, and made me His! With loving souls
    Your art-like eyes be filled with tears, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (40)

    XI.

    When He, Her spouse whose eyes shine bright, mixt with my soul,
    And made me His, deeds and environments died out;
    Upon this earth confusion died; all other memries ceasd;
    How all my doings died, SING WE, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (44)

    XII.

    Ascetic bands sore languishd, longing for release.
    Grace to the elephant he gave, made me His own;
    The light suprene deep plunged me in devotions sea!
    How sweet His mercy is, SING WE, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (48)

    XIII.

    Not those on earth, nor in th abyss, nor heavenly ones,-
    To none beside, so near He drew; He made me His!
    To sing His advent, or Him, th only Great, conceive
    Is hard, His glory-song SING WE, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (52)

    XIV.

    Mal, Ayan, all the gods, and Sciences divine,
    His essence cannot pierce. This Being rare drew near to me;
    In love He thrilled my soul! WIth this remembrance moved,
    Let your bright eyes with tears oerflow, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (56)

    XV.

    The spreading sea of grace superne that melts and swells,
    From which tis sweet to draw and drink, we gather round.
    The Feet of the bright southern Lord call we to mind,
    His slaves, praise we His sacred grace, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (60)

    XVI.

    Buddhan, Purandaran, the primal Ayan, Mal, praise Him,
    The One-distraught, Who dwells in Perun-turrais shrine, -the Sire
    Who made births cease,-Lord of fair Tillais porch, His gracious Feet
    How in my soul they entered, SING, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (64)

    XVII.

    I lay bewildered in the barren troublous sea
    Of sects and systems wide discordant all;-
    My care He banished, gave in grce His jewelled Feet;
    Praise we His gracious acts, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (68)

    XVIII.

    Though Ether, Wind, Water, Earth should fail,
    His constant Being fails not, knows no weariness!
    In Him my body, soul, and thought, and mind were merged.
    How all myself was lost, SING WE, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (72)

    XIX.

    Prime Source of heavenly ones, the Germ of those beneath,
    Earths Balm; Mals, Ayans Treasure, open eyed
    We saw, SING YE, His gracious feet, Who dwelt with us!
    Call Him Lord of the Southern-Land, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (76)

    XX.

    Sing His race; sing the herons wing; Her beauty sing
    Who wears bright gems; sing how He poison ate; each day
    In Tillais temple court He dances, where the waters play;
    His tinkling anklets music SING, AND BEAT TELLENAM! (80)

    Hymn XII- tiru Caral
    THE SACRED CARAL
    THE SPORT OF CIVANS GRACIOUS ENERGY.
    I. Objections to ashes, the snake, and the mystery of His teaching.

    Obj.What He smears is white ash; what He wears is an angry snake;
    What He speaks with His lips divine is the mystic word, it seems; MY DEAR!
    Ans.What He smears, what He says, what He wears are the means by which He,
    As my Lord, rules me; and of all that hath life the Essence is He! CARALO! (4)

    ----
    These are the words used by Dakshan to his daughter Umai in the Kaci Khandam,:-

    His body he smears with ashes; a serpent he wears as adornment;
    Poison from the sea he eats; a skull he carries
    He rides a white bull that rages with anger. Such an one,
    O damsel, is he fit to come to our sacrifice?

    The ashes, the serpent, the poison, the skull, and the bull are matters of praise in all Caiva poems.
    -----
    II. Objections to His mendicant gruise.

    Obj.My Father, Embiran, to all indeed is Ruler Supreme;
    Yet He wears a clouted kovanam; and why should this be so, MY DEAR?
    Ans.The Vedas four, the meaning with which all lore is fraught, as the great thread
    Himself alone as kovanam He spreads; behold, CARALO! (8)

    ----
    An ascetic mendicant wears a very scanty cloth, suspended by a string round the waist; but why
    should He, who often appears in such stately majesty, wear this unseemly pretence of decent clothing!
    The answer is ambiguous in the original, but seems to say: All mysteries are containedand hiddenin Him,
    and the Vedic revelation is the link between Him and the souls of men. Strange symbolism!

    Kaman, the Bodiless.- The story of the destruction of Kaman (or the god of Love) by Civan is very
    curious, and should be read by the Tamil scholar in the Kamba-Ramayanam. It seems that Civan resolved
    to enter on a course of very strict devotion (Yogam) with the intention of increasing his powers!
    The lesser divinities fearing this, instigated Kaman to endeavour to distract the mind of the devotee.
    Accordingly the archer sallied forth with his arrows composed of the nine most fragrant flowers, and
    having fitted one on to the string, took aim at Civans sacred breast. But the god suddenly opened his
    third eye in the centre of his brow, from which he darted a wrathful flame that instantly reduced Kaman
    to ashes. At the intercession of all orders of creation Kaman was restored to life, but not to a visible
    substantial form, and he still pervades the world riding on the chariot of the soft south-wind, working
    his mischief unseen. Ancient European mythology made him blind: he is here bodiless. The legend may
    remind us of the story of Echo. The allusions to this myth in these lyrics are endless - and wearisome.
    -----
    III. The objection that Civan is a homeless ascetic.

    Obj.His shrines the burning ground; fierce tiger skin His goodly garb;
    All motherless and fatherless is He; all lonely dwelleth; see, MY DEAR!
    Ans.Motherless is He and fatherless; dwelleth all aone; but thoughtis thus,
    If He be wroth, the worlds to powder crumble all; behold, CARALO! (12)

    IV. The punitive indications of Bhairavan.

    Obj.Ayan, the Bodiless, with Anthagan, and Canthiran,
    In divers ways He wounded sore, yet slew not; see, MY DEAR!
    Ans.He Whose eyes are three, the Ruler great, if He shall punish,
    Ist not a triumph to the heavnly ones, O thou with flowing locks? CARALO! (16)

    V. Dakshans sacrifice.

    Obj.Of Dakshan He smote off the head, off Eccan too; the hosts of gods
    That flocking came He sent to nothingness; why this, MY DEAR?
    Ans.Them who thronging came to nothingness He sent; twas grace!
    In grace to Eccan too He gave one head the more; see CARALO! (20)

    VI. Arunachalam.

    Obj.Him the flowry god and Mal knew not; in fiery form He came
    From earth that stretchd to lower worlds; wherefore was this, MY DEAR?
    Ans.From earth to realms beneath had He not reachd, they twain
    The insolence of self-esteem had not cast off; behold, CARALO! (24)

    VII. Parvathi lives in His side, Ganga on His crest.

    Obj.Soon as the mountain maid as part of Him He placed, another dame
    In watery form upon His braided locks poured down! Why this, MY DEAR?
    Ans.Upon His braided locks in watery form had she not leaped, the world
    To cavernous destruction rushing ruined must have lain! CARALO! (28)

    VIII. The poison.

    Obj.He ate halalam from the sounding sea, that day arisen
    With mighty din; what means this wondrous act, MY DEAR?
    Ans.Had He not eaten on that day the posion fierce, Ayan and Mal
    And all the other gods of upper heaven had died; behold, CARALO! (32)

    -----
    The Hala-hala Poison, the churning of the sea, the blackness of Civans Throat, and the epithet Ambrosia.-
    Among other things in these lyrics that require explanation to the English reader, the subjects referred
    to in the above title are of the most frequent recurrence, and are apt to weary and even disgust.

    It is most necessary however to understand once for all how essential they are to the South-Indian
    concept of Civan, as the great and beneficient Being Who is to be approached in prayer and gratefully
    adored. It will hardly be possible for the reader to do anything like justice to the Poet and religious Teacher,
    unless he deem it worth while to make the attempt to view these things candidly and dispassionately in the
    light in which they are viewed by the more devout and intelligent of the Caiva community.

    The legend is simply this: the lesser deities were in sore affliction and came to Civan for help.
    He accordingly came forth from Kailaca, and using Mount Mandara as His churning-stick, with Vasu-deva
    as the rope which caused it to revolve, proceeded to churn the sea of milk. The result was the
    appearance of the Ambrosia or food of immortal gladness. But before this a stream of fiery poison
    black and deadly, the Hala-halapoison, rushed forth. This the deity himself drank up, and hence his
    throat is for ever black, a glorious memorial of his voluntary sufferings. The cup of ambrosia He
    gave to the grateful gods. Another version of this story may be read in Wilsons Vishnu Puranam.
    It is also to be found in various form in Tamil verse, but is essentially a Sanskrit and northern myth.
    The question occurs, was this regarded as literal fact, or was it put forth as a parable? It may be said
    that three classes of Hindus are to be met with in the South: those to whom this and similar histories
    are wonderful stories and nothing more. They take no more interest in them than we should in the
    Arabian Nights Entertainments.

    A second class believe the legends devoutly, and regard them as capable of a mystic interpretation
    to which however they do not attach any surpassing importance, nor are they at all agreed as to its details.
    The third class think that under the veil of such legends ancient sages concealed mysterious teachings
    which they were unwilling to expose to the vulgar gaze. And they say that they alone possess the secret
    of the esoteric meaning of the myths, which they themselves regard as more or less antiquated and uncouth.

    Whether the Upanishads and Sanskrit literature in general lend any countenance to this last idea is
    exceedingly doubtful. I incline to think that these mystic interpretations are only to be found in later, and
    chiefly in South-Indian, authors. It is very ceratin that the Caiva Siddhantaphilosophers have made it their
    especial business to give to all such legends a more elevating, and at the same time distinctly Caivite,
    interpretation. The south of India has from the earliest time been more open than the rest of the east to
    western influences and teaching, and I feel convinced that this is one of the results. Whether in any way
    the chasm between western and eastern ideas can be bridged over by any such explanations is of course
    a most interesting question.

    It is quite permitted us to say that, the truth supposed to be concealed (rather too carefully!) under
    these symbols is that, the Supreme Being has condescended to come to earth to taste the bitter cup of
    suffering, retaining ever the glorious signs of that agony, while to men He presents the draught of immortal
    blessedness. However this may be, the epithets of Black-throated and Ambrosia as applied to Civan need
    not be, must not be, simply grotesque, but associated with the pathos of sufferring and the tenderness of
    unselfish love.

    The idea of this is expressed in the first poem of the Purra-Nannurru, which is by Perundevanar,
    the translator of the Bharatam:-

    He wears thadornment of a throat with poison black; that stain
    The chaunters of the mystic scrolls are wont to praise.

    Of course there are many things which are said and sung by the devout of all systems in all lands
    that require to be explained, and it will generally be found that a mystic meaning is at the root of the
    uncouth phrase. This has been more or less lost sight of: the symbol is apt to supersede the real thought.
    -----
    IX.

    Obj.The Lord of Tillais court, Who in the southern land delights, and dances there,
    A mighty maniac, delighted in the female form, behold, MY DEAR!
    Ans.had He not delighted in the female form, all in the wide world
    Would have obtained heavens bliss and earth had failed; behold, CARALO! (36)

    X.

    Obj.He is the endless One; and me, a dog, who came to Him,
    He plunged in tide of rapturous bliss unending; behold, MY DEAR!
    Ans.The sacred Feet that plunged me in raptures flowing tide
    are treasure rich to gods in upper heaven that dwell; behold, CARALO! (40)

    XI.

    Obj.Lady! whats this ascetic rite? Sinews and bone He wears,
    A bony circlet on His arm He loves to bear; behold, MY DEAR!
    Ans.The way of the bony circlet hear! In the end of the age
    When the twohad reached their fated hour, He put it on; hehold, CARALO! (44)

    XII.

    Obj.His garb is the skin of the forest tiger; He eats from a skull;
    The wild is His city; to Him here who will service pay? MY DEAR!
    Ans.Yet, hear thou! Ayan and sacred Mal, and the King
    Of them of the heavenly land, are His humble and faithful ones; CARALO! (48)

    XIII. His marriage.

    Obj.The mountain monarchs golden Daughter bright of brow, the Lady blest,
    He wedded with the fire as all the world doth know; whats that? say, MY DEAR!
    Ans.Had He not wedded Her for all the world to know, the world entire
    Had in confusion lost the import true of every lore; behold, CARALO! (52)

    XIV. The dance.

    Obj.The Lord of Tillais court, by cool palms girt, whence honey drips,
    There entering does a mystic dance perform; whats that, MY DEAR?
    Ans.Had He not enterd there, all the wide earth had quick become
    Abode of demons armed with flesh-transfixing appears; CARALO! (56)

    XV. The bull.

    Obj.On stately elephant, swift stead, or car it pleased Him not to ride;
    A bull He pleased to mount! Explain me this that I may know, MY DEAR!
    Ans.The day He burnt with fire the triple mighty walls,
    Mal divine a bull became to bear Him up; behold, CARALO! (60)

    XVI. Civan a guru and an avenger too.

    Obj.Well to the four, the fourfold mystic scrolls deep sense,
    That day, beneath the banyan tree, and virtue He reveald; behold, MY DEAR!
    Ans.That day, beneath the banyan tree, though virtue He revealed,
    He utterly destroyed the cities three; begold, CARALO! (64)

    XVII. A mendicant.

    Obj.In the sacred hall He dances, and wanders abroad to beg for alms;
    This homeless mendicant shall we approach as god? How so, MY DEAR?
    Ans.Hear thou the nature of this sacred mendicant! Him Vedas four know not;
    But theyve invokd Him Lord and Ican, praising loud; behold, CARALO! (68)

    XVIII. The disc.

    Obj.When He smote down Jalandharan, the monster of the sea, that disc
    To Naranan, the good, in grace He gave; hows that, MY DEAR?
    Ans.Since Naranan, the good, dug out an eye, and laid at Arans foot,
    As flower, to him in grace the disc He gave; behold, CARALO! (72)

    IX.

    Obj.His garment is the spotted hide; His food the fiery poison dark.
    Is this our Perumans great skill? Expound that I may know, MY DEAR!
    Ans.Our Peruman,- whatever He wore there,- whateer He ate,-
    The greatness of His Nature none can know; behold, CARALO! (76)

    X. Virtue and true philosophy must be divinely taught.

    Obj.To saints of goodness rare, beneath the Al, virtue and all the Four He taught;
    Explain to me the grace He showed, seated with them, MY DEAR!
    Ans.Had He not taught that day in grace, the worthy saints virtue and all the Four,
    To noble souls this worlds nature had neer been known! Behold, CARALO! (80)

    Hymn XIII- tiru puvalli
    THE SACRED LILY-FLOWERS
    or
    TAKING THE VICTORY FROM MAYA
    I. Renunciation of other help.

    His sacred Feet,- the twain,-soon as upon my head He placed,
    Help of encircling friends,- the whole,- I utterly renounced;
    In Tillais court begirt with guarded streams, in mystic dance
    He moves. That Raftsmans glory SING, AND PLUCK THE LILY-FLOWERS! (4)

    II. Further experiences in Madyarjunam.

    From father, mother, kindered, and all else that were to me
    As bonds, He set me free; made me His own,- the Pandi-Lord!
    In Idai-maruthu, His dwelling, raptures honey flowed.
    That sweet recess with song PRAISE WE, AND PLUCK THE LILY-FLOWERS! (8)

    III. Converting grace.

    Us too, than dogs more vile, of worth and note He made to be;
    With greater than a mothers tenderness, our Peruman
    Cut off illusive birth, made us His own; our deeds so strong
    Laid prostrate humbled in the dust; PLUCK WE THE LILY-FLOWERS! (12)

    IV. The Rebel-rout.

    They praised not the king of Tillais town, mid well-tilled fields,
    Dakshan renownd, and Arukkan, and Eccan, Moon, and Fire!
    By Vira-bhadra with his demon host that filld the sky,
    Sing how that day they sufferd wounds; AND PLUCK THE LILY-FLOWERS! (16)

    V. Perun-turrai and Tillai.

    Civan, the Lord, who on His lock the honied cassia wears,
    Took fleshy rom, sought me, and entering came; before the world
    That I may dance, and utter triumph songs, in dance
    He moves! For Him, King of heavens sons, PLUCK WE THE LILY-FLOWERS! (20)

    VI. The Triads.

    THREE fires He gave in gracious pity to the gods;
    THREE heads to sever fire He sent from sacred brow, in grace;
    THREE forms He wears, the Only-One, Incomprehensible;
    THREE rebel towns He burnt; so PLUCK THE LILY-FLOWERS! (24)

    VII. His gracious work.

    He made my head to bow; my mouth to laud His cinctured Foot
    He taught; gave me to join thassemblage of His glorious saints;
    And with the Queen, in Tillais court adorned, dances our Peruman.
    Sing we aloud His excellence, AND PLUCK THE LILY-FLOWERS! (28)

    VIII.

    He taught the pathway to the golden Feet of His great saints,
    Praise ye the Masters grace that made me His and gave the sign!
    Old deeds that made us wholly bond-slaves, sorely troubled us,
    Sing how He brought to naught; AND SO PLUCK WE THE LILY-FLOWERS! (32)

    IX.

    That I might praise Him many a day, and service due perform,
    The Mighty-One His fragrant foot-flower on my frame impressd;
    A beauteous Light He shone, softened my heart, and made me His!
    Sing how those jewelld Feet are gold, AND PLUCK THE LILY-FLOWERS! (36)

    X.

    That this my frame, mere mass of fierce desires, might pass away,
    Great Perun-turrais Lord placed on my head His glorious Foot.
    KABALI,- Who, well pleased, black poison ate from out the sea, -
    Sing we, amidst His warring foes, AND PLUCK THE LILY-FLOWERS! (40)

    XI.

    The BEING INFINITE, with every varied sweetness filled;
    The LORD, Who took my soul in joyous pomp; His sounding Feet
    All dwellers in the world shall praise! That is the way of good!
    That way sing we His glory now, AND PLUCK THE LILY-FLOWERS! (44)

    XII.

    Heavens Lord, and Mal, and Ayan, and the other gods He rules
    As King, with attributes and signs that none may eer attain;
    The fiery poison from the vasty sea, He made His food
    Ambrosia; and thus sing we, AND PLUCK THE LILY-FLOWERS! (48)

    XIII.

    That day, beneath the banyans shade, in grace the Vedas rare
    He gave; the heavenly ones and mighty saints, each day, stood round,
    And praised Him of the perfect Foot with cassia-flower adornd;
    Its golden petals dust sing we, AND PLUCK THE LILY-FLOWERS! (52)

    XIV.

    Fair pictured in my soul His Feets twin flowers in grace He gave;
    The Lord, Who in Ekambam dwells, made here His chosen seat;
    In Tillais sacred court, girt by wide walls, is now His home;
    Sing how in mystic dance He moves, AND PLUCK THE LILY-FLOWERS! (56)

    XV. Dakshans sacrifice.

    Fire and the Sun, and Ravanan, and Andhagan, and Death,
    With red-eyd Hari, Ayan, Indra, and the Moon-god too,
    And shameless Dakshan and the Eccan: these their honour lost!
    Singing His swelling glory now, PLUCK WE THE LILY-FLOWERS! (60)

    XVI.

    The strong bulls Rider; Champion brave of those of Civa-town;
    In Madura, earth-carrier; in grace He ate the cakes;
    Was smitten by the Pandiyans staff, who claimed His service there.
    Sing the song of the wound He bore, AND PLUCK THE LILY-FLOWERS! (64)

    XVII.

    The ancient Mal, Ayan, the heavenly ones, the Danavar,
    Knew not His sacred golden Foot, but joined in praise!
    Entering within my breast, He made me His! His ornament
    The gleaming serpent SING WE THUS, AND PLUCK THE LILY-FLOWERS! (68)

    XVIII.

    That with desire insatiate my soul might ever joy
    At sound of tinkling anklets on His glorious sacred Foot,
    In dance He moves,- the Lord of Perun-turrais car-thronged streets.
    This mighty rapture chaunting loud, PLUCK WE THE LILY-FLOWERS! (72)

    XIX.

    The Perun-turrai-Lord, Who wears the hide of elephant;
    Who took a madmans form;- Who in this world became a child;
    Source of all heavenly bliss; great Uttara-koca-mangais Prince;
    As in our minds He entering cam, PLUCK WE THE LILY-FLOWERS! (76)

    Hymn XIV- tiru unthiyar
    THE UNTHIYAR
    or
    SACRED VICTORY
    CIVANS TRIUMPHS

    Tamil scholars give different interpretations of the word Unthiyar. It seems to mean the players at a
    game resembling battledore and shuttlecock. The word Unthiis, I imagine, used for the shuttlecock or
    ball which the players cause to fly aloft.

    In this lyric FIVE GREAT TRIUMPHS OF CIVAN are celebrated.

    I. The first of these (I-4) is the destruction of the three towns, in Tami and Sanskrit Tripura, which
    is curiously enough made to be the name of a giant overthrown by Civan. I give an abstract of this story from Muir:-

    There were in the sky three cities of the Asuras, one of iron, another of silver, and a third of gold,
    which Indra could not demolish, with all his weapons. Then all the great gods, distressed, went to Rudra
    as their refuge, and said to him, after they were assembled: Rudra, there shall be victims devoted to
    thee in all sacrifices. Bestower of honour, destroy the Daityas with their cities, and deliver the worlds.
    He, being thus addressed, said, So be it; and making Vishnu his arrow, Agni its barb, Yama, the son of
    Vivasvat, its feather, all the Vedas his bow, and the excellent Savitri (the Gayatri) his bowstring, and
    having appointed Brahma his charioteer, he in due time pierced through these cities with a three-jointed
    three-barbed arrow, of the colour of the sun, and in fierceness like the fire which burns up the world.
    These Asuras with their cities were there burnt up by Rudra.

    II. The second of these triumphs is the destruction of Dakshans sacrifice. The story of this is told with
    many variations, and is evidently, as Professor Wilson pointed out long ago, of some great struggle
    between the followers of Vishnu and Civan: but it is neither possible to give any full interpretation of
    it, nor to reconcile the discrepancies in the various accounts of it. The account given below is that of
    the Kaci Khandam, which every student of Tamil should read.

    In the Kaci Khandam, the account of Dakshan-his sacrifice, punishment, forgiveness, and penance
    in Benares - occupies chapters xxxviii-xc inclusive, and fills 148 stanzas. It sums up, with some
    inconsistencies, the whole story as given in the Sanskrit books. Dakshan (- the Intelligent) is represented
    sometimes as the father, and sometimes as the son of Aditi; and at other times the two are curiously said
    to have been reciprocally producers and produced. He is identified with Prajapati, the Creator. This almost
    seems like a statement that the whole universe is developed from intelligence, and might appear like a very
    symbolical acting forth of Hegels system. Dakshan had many daughters married to the great saints, and
    especially Kacyapa(Kaciban) is said to have been the husband of twelve of them. One of his daughters
    was Durga, or Uma, who was subsequently born from the mountain after her voluntary death, and
    so received the name of Parvathi. So Civan, the Supreme, was a son-in-law of Dakshan, the Intelligence
    from which the Universe was developed. It is rather entangled.

    On one occasion all the gods and saints made a visit to the silver mountain Kailaca. They were there
    received with great kindness, by the mighty one upon whose head is the Kondral wreath, whose throat is
    black with the poison he swallowed to save the world, and from the centre of whose forehead a third eye
    shines resplendent. But the deity did not recognize his father-in-law, nor rise to receive him. This fills
    Dakshan with disgust, and he proceeds to indulge in the most extravagant abuse of Civan. It will be seen
    that everything with which he reproaches Civan is used by Manikka-Vacagar as praise. Of course a mystical
    meaning is given to each circumstance! The following is a summary of his language:-

    He has no mother, no father, and no relatives!
    He is a maniac who dances with demons on the burning-ground.
    He has an eye in his brow from which devouring fire blazes forth.
    He wears the skin of a fierce tiger, foul and fetid.
    Race, family, caste, quality hath he none.
    He wears as an ornament the skin of a serpent that causes deadly ill.
    He has discarded the anointing of himself with flowery essences,
    And besmears himself with foul ashes of corpses in the burning-ground.
    His food is poison from the billowy sea;
    As conveyance he has an ancient bullock;
    He wears the skin of a black elephant;
    His ruddy hand grasps a skull bereft of flesh.
    If you say he is a Brahman, he has changed all rules of ordered life;
    If you say he is a merchant full of wealth, he goes about begging;
    He has no skill in any mystic lore.
    Nor is he a Brahmacari, for a large-eyed damsel is part of his body;
    He bears an implement of war, and so is not a worthy ascetic;
    He wanders amid the hot desert sands, and so is no seemly householder;
    He cut off the head of the flower god,
    So knows not the laws of excellent justice;
    The lady with gleaming brows is half of his frame,
    So he is not male, or female, or sexless one.
    In the day when he destroys all worlds,
    Having worn as a garland the skull of flowery Ayan,
    And whirling the three-headed gleaming lance
    Everywhere he kills, Is it possible to call him a saint?

    After thus relieving his mind by abuse to punish Civans discourtesy, he resolves to perform a mighty
    sacrifice (magam), and so gain additional powers. Civan must be dethroned or slain. All the gods are invited,
    and there is a very magnificent assembly on Dakshans mountain. Then comes forth a sage Dadici, who protests
    that no sacrifice can be of efficacy to which Civan has not been invited; such a place of worship must become
    a burning-ground, where goblins, demons, and dogs prowl around. His protest is answered by additional abuse,
    and so the devotees depart, leaving the gods and goddessess to joint with Dakshan in the unhallowed offering.
    And now the great mischief maker in all such legends, whose name was Naradar, the sweet lutist of the holy
    mount, hurries to Kailaca to tell the goddess Umai of her father-in laws projected offering. She longs to be
    present, and implores her spouse to permit it, but he rejects her request. Somehow or other she does however
    go, and with every token of filial piety meets her father and mother; and after the first greeting enquires why
    the great god, the lord of all, is not invited:

    It seems as though you had forgotten the greatest of guests.

    To this, abuse of Civan is the only answer.

    She at once dies, puts off the body which owns Dakshan as father, and is reborn as the daughter of Himavat,
    whence, Civan afterwards takes her as Parvathi, the mountain maid.

    III. The third triumph is his bestowal of the milky sea on the son of Vasishtha. For this it is sufficient to refer t
    o the Koyil Puranam. It is a rather confused and somewhat meaningless story as it has come down to us.

    IV. The fourth triumph is given at great length in the Kaci Khandam, and is connected with the gods manifestation
    as Vira-bhadra. For this it is only necessary to refer to chapter xc of the above work.

    In regard to the Kaci Khandam, indeed, which is mainly a translation from the Sanskrit Skanda Purana, it must be
    noted that there is in it much didactic poetry of a more elevated character, which characterized as a collection of
    legends which are uterly unprofitable, and have been worked into the devotional poetry of the Caivites to its very
    great detriment. The legends of Dakshans sacrifice, of the appearance and ferocity of Vira-bhadra as a kind of
    incarnation of Civan, and of the unseemly disputes between Vishnu and Brahma as to the pre-eminence, occupy
    large portions of the book and are utterly useless in these days. We may give a summary of chapter xxxi,
    entitled The Appearance of Bhairava.

    Civan, the Supreme, envelopes the world in elusive mystery, so that none know him while He is all in all.
    Hence, even among the gods, disputes arose as to who was the greatest. I am the supreme Essence, cried
    Vishnu. I am the Self-existent, declared Brahma from his lotus-seat. The sacred Veda, the unwritten record of
    mysterious truth, was called upon to decide. The divine essences whose incarnation, or manifestation rather, is
    the fourfold Veda spoke out: The first Vedic genius declared that since Civan alone performed the three operations
    of creation, preservation, and destruction, he was the Supreme and unoriginated God. The second declared that
    since Civan had performed arduous sacrifices and penances, so as to merit praise from the whole universe, he was
    the supreme. The third announced the same conclusion, but based it upon the fact that Civan fills all things with light,
    and is adored by all the mystic sages as the giver of wisdom. The fourth Vedic mystery declared that since Civan
    revealed himself in various forms exciting emotions of joy and ecstatic devotion in the hearts of his worshippers,
    who beheld him crowned with cassia-wreaths, he was the greatest of the gods. [It is easy to see the arguments by
    which the supremacy of Civan is here upheld, and there are gleams of truth which Christianity emphasises and
    illustrates, but the legends connected with the statements are very wonderful, and certainly obscure and confuse,
    rather than illustrate, the truth concerning the supreme and absolute.] Vishnu and Brahma listen only to deride.
    Civan, they cry, rides on a bull; he has a matted coil of hair; he dances in the burning-ground; he smears ashes;
    his throat is black with the swallowed poison; he wears as a girdle a hissing snake; he is the leader of a wild
    demon-host, and Umai is a part of his form. This being so, how can he be the life of the soul of all ?
    [These are the arguments that were urged by Jains and Buddhists, and the wonder is that they did not
    everywhere and finally prevail.]

    Roused by these insults, Civan suddenly appears. His aspect is described in the usual terms, and he
    sends forth a manifestaion or incarnation of himself, or of his destroying energy, to which the name of
    Vairavan (Vira-bhadra) is given. This anomalous being is of terrific appearance, and endowed with all the
    Destroyers terrible energy. He is followed by a host of malignant demons. Civan calls him his son, and bids
    him destroy all his enemies. Vairavan accordingly seizes the fifth head of Brahma between his thumb and
    forefinger, twists it off and throws it on the ground, performing a terrific dance which throws the whole universe
    and every order of sentient existence into a paroxysm of terror. This subdues the opposing deities, and Vishnu
    worships at Civans feet, praising him in the most extravagant terms. The whole ends in a wild orgy, in which
    Civan and Brahma join. This is so often referred to in Caivite poetry, and seems so incapable of any edifying
    interpretation, that we have thought it necessary to give the authentic summary from the Kaci Khandam once
    for all.

    V. The last is the victory over the Ceylon king, Ravana. This legend is perpetually referred to in the south,
    and seems to have a popularity among the poets somewhat in excess of its apparent importance.

    After his victory over Kuvera, Ravana went to Saravana, the birthplace of Karthikeya. Ascending the mountain,
    he sees another delightful wood, where his car Pushpaka stops, and will proceed no further. He then beholds a
    formidable dark tawny-coloured dwarf, called Nandicvara, a follower of Mahadeva, who desires him to halt, as
    that deity is sporting on the mountain, and has made it inaccessible to all creatures, the gods included. Ravana
    angrily demands who Cankara (Mahadeva) is, and laughs contemptuously at Nandicvara, who has the face of a
    monkey. Nandicvara, who was another body of Civan, being incensed at this contempt of his monkey form,
    declares that beings, possessing the same shape as himself, and of similar energy,-monkeys,- shall be
    produced to destroy Ravanas race (Tasmad mad-virya-sanyuktah madrupa-sama-tejasah utpatsyanti badhartham
    hi kulasya tava vanarah). Nandicvara adds that he could easily kill Ravana now, but that he has been already slain
    by his own deeds. Ravana threatens that as his car has been stopped, he will pluck up the mountain by the roots,
    asking in virtue of what power Civan continually sports on that spot, and boasting that he must now be made to
    know his danger. Ravana then throws his arms under the mountain, which being lifted by him, shakes, and makes
    the hosts of Rudra tremble, and even Parvathi herself quake, and cling to her husband (Chachala Parvathi, chapi
    tada clishta Mahecvaram). Civan, however, presses down the mountain with his great toe, and along wit it crushes
    the arms of Ravana, who utters a loud cry, which shakes all creation. Ravanas counsellors then exhort him to
    propitiate Mahadeva, the blue-throated lord of Uma, who, on being lauded, will become gracious. Ravana accordingly
    praises Mahadeva with hymns, and weeps for a thousand years. Mahadeva is then propitiated, lets go Ravanas
    arms, says his name shall be Ravana from the cry (rava) he had uttered, and sends him away, with the gift of a
    sword bestowed on him at his request.
    [Metre: kavithal isai]

    I. The three cities

    Bent was the bow;- upsprang the tumult;
    Perished three cities! Fly aloft, Unthi!
    As they burnt straightway together,- Fly, &c. (3)

    Two arrows we saw not- in Egambars hand:
    One arrow; three cities! Fly aloft, Until!
    And one was too many !- Fly, &c. (6)

    There was shaking of framework;- and as He moved His foot,
    The axle was broken- say, Fly aloft, unthi!
    Perished three cities! - Fly, &c. (9)

    Those who won their escape- a triad of persons-He guarded.
    To Him whose arrows fail not,- Fly aloft, Unthi!
    Saying, Hes the Tender-Ones Spouse!- Fly, &c. (12)

    II. Dakshans sacrifice.

    The frustrate offering thrown to the ground-the gods-
    Sing how they fled!-Fly aloft, Unthi!
    To Rudra the Lord,-Fly, &c. (15)

    Aha! Mal divine got a portion that day of the offering;
    And He died not!- Fly aloft, Unthi!
    The Four-faceds father!- Fly, &c. (18)

    The fierce one- Agni-to consume it collected
    His hands of flame. He cut them away! - Fly aloft, Unthi!
    Spoiled was the sacrifice! - Fly, &c. (21)

    Dakshan, who raised the anger of Parvathi,
    He saw and spared, what good? my dear!- Fly aloft, Unthi!
    To the SPouse of the Beautiful, - Fly &c. (24)

    Purandharan became a tender kuyil,
    And flew up a tree!- Fly away, Unthi!
    King of the heavenly ones!- Fly, &c. (27)

    The angry sacrificers head-
    Sing how it fell! - Fly aloft, Unthi!
    That births chain may be snapt! - Fly, &c. (30)

    The head of a sheep- to Vidhi- as his-
    Sing how He joined!-Fly aloft, Unthi!
    While youre with laughter convulsed!- Fly, &c. (33)

    Sing how Bhagan, who cam to eat, scaped not,
    He plucked out his eye!- Fly aloft, Unthi!
    That germs of our birth may die!-Fly, &c. (36)

    The Lady of the tongue lost a nose; Brahma a head;-
    The Moon-gods face He smashed!-Fly aloft, Unthi!
    That ancient troublous deed might die!- Fly, &c. (39)

    The god of the Vedas four, the Lord of the sacrifice,
    Fell; sing how he sought the way they went!- Fly aloft, Unthi!
    And Purandharan, too, in the offering!-Fly, &c. (42)

    The teeth in the mouth of the Sun-god
    How He swept them broken away!-Fly aloft, Unthi!
    The sacrifice came to confusion!-Fly, &c. (45)

    Dakshan that day lost his head;
    Tho Dakshans children stood round!-Fly aloft, Unthi!
    Perished the sacrifice!- Fly, &c. (48)

    III. Ubamanya.

    Who that day to the son gave the sea of milk;
    To the glorious Lord of the braided lock,-Fly aloft, Unthi!
    To Kumarans father,- Fly, &c. (51)

    IV. Brahma.

    The Four-faceds head, who sits on the beauteous flower,
    Was quickly nipt off!-Fly aloft, Unthi!
    By His nail was nipt off!- Fly, &c. (54)

    V. Ravana.

    His heads who stayed the car, and raised the hill,-
    Sing how twice five of them perished!-Fly aloft, Unthi!
    And twenty perished!-Fly, &c. (57)

    Hymn XV- tiru tonokkam
    Metre : Naladittaravu koccuk kalippA

    There is an amusing illustration drawn by a native artist, of this game as played in South India. Its name
    literally means aiming at the shoulder, for it ends up with placing the hands of each opposing pair on the
    shoulders of the other. In some lines this is used as a symbol of the approach of the soul to Civans feet.

    I. The cleansing from delusion.

    The demon-car allures: a stream flowing from flowery lake,
    Men think, and rush to draw, in ignorance and folly lost!
    Thou hast such fond delusions far removed, O Dancer blest
    In shining Tillais court! As we Thy roseate Foot would reach,
    PLAY WE TONOKKAM! (4)

    II.

    The Lord of Tillais court, whose glory never wanes;
    Whom he who hurled the calf at fruit, and Brahma could not see;
    Lest I in endless births and deaths should sink, made me His own;
    Praising His excellence, ye maids with thickly clusterig locks,
    PLAY WE TONOKKAM! (8)

    III. Kannappar.

    As in the worship paid true ministrations HE discerned:-
    The glorious slippered-foot, the chalice-mouth, the flesh for food;-
    Such gifts acceptance gained! He knew the woodmans pure desire;
    And as the saint stood there, with joyous mind, fulfilled of grace,
    PLAY WE TONOKKAM! (12)

    IV.

    So that my stony heart was melted, He all tenderly
    Compassionate stood by, and came within my soul in grace,
    Led me in way of good; and then, as all the country knows,
    He here drew nigh, spake with me face to face; and thus
    PLAY WE TONOKKAM! (16)

    V. God manifold, yet One.

    Earth, water, fire, air, ether vast, the wandering moon, the sun,
    And man, - to sense revealed: EIGHT WAYS He joined Himself to me;
    Throughout seven worlds, in regions ten, He moves: yet One alone
    Is He! As manifold He comes and bides with us; and so
    PLAY WE TONOKKAM! (20)

    VI. Various sectaries.

    Buddhists, and others,- in their wisdom fools,- the men of many sects,
    All with their systems worthless and outworn, bewildered stand;-
    My every power He fills with bliss superne, makes all lifes works
    Devotion true,-through His compassion, FATHER seen! And thus
    PLAY WE TONOKKAM! (24)

    VII. Candecuvara Nayanar.

    The Neophyte from evil free, cut off the feet of him
    Who rashly overturned the work in Civans honour done:
    A Brahman he in caste, His father too! Through Icans grace,
    While gods adored, his crime was utterly consumed; and thus
    PLAY WE TONOKKAM! (28)
    ----

    The Legend of Candecuvara Nayanar: The Young Brahman Cowherd.- In a town in the Cora country,
    called Ceynalur, a Brahman boy was born, whose name was Vicara-carumar, who from his earliest
    days instinctively understood the whole Caiva creed; so that when the sages came to instruct him
    he met them with the recitation of the essential doctrines of the system, which he had grasped by
    a divine intuition. It may be permitted to repeat the articles of his creed, as these are summed up
    in the legend: All souls are from everlasting fast bound in the chains of impurity. To destroy that
    impurity, and to give to these souls infinite felicity and eternal release, He who is eternal is revealed.
    He performs the five Acts of creation, preservation, destruction, envelopment, and gracious deliverance.
    He is the one Lord (Pathi), Who possesses the eight attributes of absolute independence, purity of form,
    spontaneous understanding, absolute knowledge, natural freedom from all bonds, infinite grace, endless
    might, and boundless blessedness. His name is Civan, the Great Lord. He performs his gracious acts
    by putting forth the energy (Catti), Who, as a person, is one with Him, and is therefore the divine Mother
    of all, as He is the divine Father, and must with Him be loved and worshipped. Nor can we say we will
    do this in some future birth, for we are born here as human beings for this and no other purpose; and
    the human form in the infinite series of transmigration is hard to attain unto. Nor should we defer till
    to-morrow our dedication of ourselves, since we know not the day of our death. Therefore must we
    avail ourselves of Civans gift of grace, studying the sacred Agamas and other works, without doubting,
    or commingling of perverse interpretation. This is the WAY of life!

    One day, together with his school companions, he went down to the bank of the river where the village
    cows were grazing in charge of a man of the herdsman caste. This rustic, having no sense of right and
    wrong, beat one of the cows with a stick; but Vicara-carumar was vehemently stirred by this outrage,
    and rushing up to him in great wrath, restrained him from striking the sacred animal: Know you not,
    said he, that cows have come down from the world of Civan to this earth? In their members the gods,
    the sages, and the sacred purifying stream dwell. The five products of these sacred creatures are the
    sacred unguents of Civan. And the ashes which are the adornment of the God and his devotees are
    made from their refuse! Dwelling upon this idea he conceived a desire to devote himself entirely to
    the task of herding and caring for the troop of sacred cows; and accordingly sent away the rustic,
    who reverentially departed. And thus our hero became a self-dedicated Brahman. As such he easily
    obtains permission of all the Brahmans of the town to take charge of their cows, and daily along
    the bank of the beautiful river Manni, he leads forth his troop in the green pastures, allowing them
    peacefully to graze their fill, and supplying them with drinking water. When the fierce heat of the
    sun oppresses, he leads them into the shady groves, and guards them well, meanwhile gathering
    the firewood necessary for his household worship; and then at evening, leaving each cow at its
    owners door, he goes to his home.

    While things went on in this manner, the cows increased daily in beauty, waxed fat, were joyous,
    and by day and night poured forth abundant streams of milk for their owners. The Brahmans found
    that they had more milk than formerly for their offerings and were glad. The cows, tended with such
    solicitude, were brisk and cheerful, and though separated for awhile from their calves that remained
    tied up in the houses, grieved not a whit, but with joy awaited the coming of their young herdsman,
    following him gladly, crowding around him like tender mothers, and lowing joyfully at the sound of his
    voice. The youthful Brahman, seeing the exuberance of their milk, reflected that this was a fitting
    unction for the head of the God; and conceiving a great desire so to employ it, constructed a
    lingamof earth on a little mound beneath the sacred Atti tree on the bank of the river, and built
    around it a miniature temple with tower and walls. He then plucked suitable flowers, and with them
    adorning the image, procured some new vessels of clay, and took from each of the cows a little
    milk, with which he performed the unction prescribed for the divine emblem (the Lingam); and
    Civan, the Supreme, looked down and received with pleasure the boy-shepherds guideless worship.
    All essentials of the sacred service he supplied by the force of his imagination. Though this was
    done daily, the supply of milk in the Brahmans dairy was no whit diminished.

    For a long time this continued, until some malicious person saw what was going on, and told it
    to the Brahmans in the village, who convened an assembly before which they summoned the boys
    father, and told him that his son Vicara-caramar was wasting the milk of the Brahmans sacred cows
    by pouring it idly on the earth in sport. The father feared greatly when he heard the accusation, but
    protested his entire ignorance of the waste and democration, and asking pardon, engaged to put a stop
    to his sons eccentric practices. Accordingly the next day he went forth to watch the boys proceedings,
    and hid himself in a thicket on the bank of the river. He soon saw his little son ceremonionaly bathe in
    the river, and then proceed to his minutine of Civa-worship, and then pouring a stream of anointing milk
    over the earthern lingam. Thus convinced of the truth of the accusation, he was greatly incensed, and
    rushing forth from his concealment inflicted severe blows upon the boy, and used many reproachful words.
    But the young devotees mind was so absorbed in the worship,- so full of the rupture of mystic devotion,-
    that he neither perceived his fathers presence, nor heard his words, nor felt his blows. Still more incensed
    by the boys insensibility, the infatuated father raised his foot, broke the vessels of consecrated milk,
    and destroyed the whole apparatus of worship! This was too much for the young enthusuast to bear; the
    god of his adoration was insulted, and the sacred worship defiled. He regarded not the fact that it was
    his father, a Brahman and a guru, who was the offender; but only saw the heinous sin and insult to Civan.
    So with the staff in his hands he aimed a blow at the offenders feet, as if to cut them off; and, behold,
    the shepherds staff became in his hands the Sacred Axe of Civan, and the father fell maimed and dying
    to the ground. The enthusiastic boy then went on with his worship as if nothing had occured, but the Lord
    Civan, with Umai, the goddess, riding on the sacred White Bull, immediately appeared hovering in the air.
    The young devotee prostrated himself before the holy vision in an ecstasy of joy; when the Supreme One
    took him up in his divine arms, saying, For my sake thou hast smiten down the father that begat thee.
    Henceforth I alone am thy father, and embracing him stroked his body with His sacred hand, and kissed
    him on the brow. The form of the child thus touched by the divine hand shone forth with ineffable lustre,
    and the God further addressed him thus: Thou shalt become the chief among my servants, and to thee
    shall be given all the offerings of food and flowers that my worshippers on Kailacas mountain present.
    His name there upon became Candecuvarar (the impetuous Lord). The manifested God finally took the
    mystic cassia-wreath from His Own head, and with it crowned the youthful saint. And so he ascended
    to heaven with Civan, and was exalted to that divine rank. The father too, who had been guilty in his
    ignorance of such impiety to the God, and had been punished by the hand of his own son, was forgiven,
    restored, and with the whole family passed into Civans abode of bliss.
    ----
    VIII.

    Our pride is gone, forgotten reasons laws; ye maidens fair!
    We think but of the cinctured foot of Him, Lord of the south,
    Whom heaven adores! The rapturous Dancers grace if we obtain,
    His slaves,- even so in rapture lost, we then shall dance; and thus
    PLAY WE TONOKKAM! (32)

    IX.

    The Three in story famed, of giant race, escaped the fire,
    And guardians stand before my Brow-eyed Fathers door; since when,
    Indras beyond compute, and Brahmas (who can count the sum?)
    Behold! And many Mals, too, on this earth have died; and thus
    PLAY WE TONOKKAM! (36)

    X. Vishnus devotion and reward

    From out a thousand lotus flowers one flower was wanting still;-
    His eye Mal straight dug out, and placed on Arans foot, our Lord!
    To Him then Cankaran forthwith the mighty discus gave,-
    A gracious recompense. Thus everywhere extolling Him,
    PLAY WE TONOKKAM! (40)

    XI. The Bhairava.

    Kaman his body lost, Kalan his life, the fiery Sun his teeth,
    The Goddess of the tongue her nose, Brahma a head, Agni his hand,
    The Moon his crescent, Dakshan, Eccan too, a head they lost.
    These holy deeds in righteous wrath He wrought; and thus
    PLAY WE TONOKKAM! (44)

    XII. Arunacalam.

    Brahma and Hari through their foolishness said each:
    The Deity! the Deity supreme am I;
    To quell their swelling pride, Aran in form of lustrous fire,
    In grandeur measureless stood forth, the Infinite; and thus
    PLAY WE TONOKKAM! (48)

    XIII. A wasted life.

    Poor servile worshipper,- how many, many a time
    Ive watered barren soil,- not worshipping the Lord Supreme!
    The Eternal-First, th imperishable flawless Gem, to me
    Came down; and bar of my embodiment destroyed; and thus
    PLAY WE TONOKKAM! (52)

    XIV. Deliverance.

    The inner Light, past speech, the Worthiest entered within
    My soul, and brought me through lusts mighty sea that knows no shore,
    And then the craving senses sateless vultures routed fled!
    Sing how a royal path in glory was made plain; and thus
    PLAY WE TONOKKAM! (56)

    Hymn XVI- tirup ponnusal

    THE SACRED GOLDEN SWING
    or
    PURIFICATION BY GRACE
    I.

    Let precious coral be the posts, strung pearls the ropes,
    Pure gold the beauteous seats,- Mount we, and sweetly sing
    The flowry Foot Narayanan knew not, to me
    His currish slave in Uttara-koca-mangai given
    As home, Ambrosial grace, that never palls, His feet impart.
    Ye guileless, bright-eyed ones, MOVE WE THE GOLDEN SWING! (6)

    II.

    Three gleaming eyes His face displays; His flowry feet
    The gods that dwell in heaven and grow not old, see not;
    In Uttara-koca-mangai seen, in flesh abides
    The King, while honied sweetness of ambrosia flows.
    Sing Idai-maruthu, His home! O ye like peafowl rare,
    Whose walk hath swanlike grace, MOVE WE THE GOLDEN SWING! (12)

    III.

    He Who no end and no beginning knows,- while saints
    A multitude, and countless heavenly ones, stood round,-
    His sacred ashes gave in grace; and mercys tide
    Flowd there: sing Uttara-koca-mangais gemlike home
    Of palaces, with terrace high, where lightnings play!
    Maids, bright with gems and gold, MOVE WE THE GOLDEN SWING! (18)

    IV.

    His throat the poison holds; Lord of the heavenly ones;
    To Uttara-koca-mangais gemlike cloud-capped heights
    He came, with Her whose words are music; filld the mind
    Of us His slaves, ambrosial sweetness gave and grace
    That cuts off death and birth! His holy praises sing!
    Ye who wear store of bracelets bright, MOVE WE THE GOLDEN SWING! (24)

    V.

    The god, Whose form the Two might not discriminate;
    In tender mercy, that the gods assembled band
    Might not know shame, but scape, made them His own, and poison ate
    As food: He, Uttara-koca-mangais Dancer, crowned
    With crescent of the moon. Praise we His worth! O ye
    With jewelld bosoms fair, AND MOVE THE GOLDEN SWING! (30)

    VI.

    The Ladys Half is He; His braided lock with flowry cassia dight
    In Uttra-koca-mangai midst his saints He dwells.
    He freed my soul from sin; made me, a cur, His own;
    From births old ill His glorious coming saves.
    His pendant ear-rings swing sing we with melting love, O ye
    With flower-crownd bosoms fair, AND MOVE THE GOLDEN SWING! (36)

    VII.

    He dwells in beauty, Lord of the great mystic word,
    Of Uttra-koca-mangai shrine, past thought; His praise
    Who sing, and worship, and bow down, He frees from bonds of sin.
    As gem-bright peafowl moving beauteous, on a swan,
    My Father came, and made me His! His beauty sing,
    Ye with gold adorned, AND MOVE THE GOLDEN SWING! (42)

    VIII.

    From glorious mountain height to earth He came,
    Ate plenteous food, arose upon the lower seas,
    In magic form upon a charger rode, and made us His;
    In sacred Uttara-koca-mangai where His virtue shines,
    With loud acclaim Him whom Mal could not reach we praise,
    And while our full hearts melt, MOVE WE THE GOLDEN SWING! (48)

    IX.

    In sacred Uttara-koca-mangais groves of cocoa-palm
    He came, in form unique a gracious light shone forth;
    Our birth He caused to cease, made such as us His own;
    The Queen His Partner, and Himself, received our homage due;
    We sing His worth Whose crest breathes cassias sweet perfume;
    Ye maids, whose jewelld bosoms heave, MOVE WE THE GOLDEN SWING! (54)

    Hymn XVII- Annai pathu

    THE MOTHER-DECAD
    or
    SOULS PLENITUDE.
    Metre: kavi viruttam

    I.

    His word is the Vedam; ashes white He wears;
    Rose-red is His form; His drum is the Natham;
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE.
    His drum is the Natham; to the Four-faced,
    And to Mal too, this Lord is the Lord;
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE. (4)

    II.

    His eye gleams black; He is compassions sea;
    Within He dwells, He melts the soul,
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE.
    Within He dwells, and to the melting soul
    Tears of undying bliss gives He,
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE. (8)

    III.

    Th eternal Bridegroom, He in minds devout
    Abides with perfect beauty crownd;
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE.
    In minds devout abides, the southern Lord,
    Perun-turrais Sire; the Blissful;
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE. (12)

    IV.

    A dancing snake His jewel, tiger-skin His robe.
    A form with ashes smeared He wears;
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE.
    The form He wears whenceer I see and gaze,
    My soul within me faints, why this?
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE. (16)

    V.

    Long are His outstretchd arms; loose flow His locks;
    Lord of the goodly Pandiyan land;
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE.
    Lord of the goodly Pandi land, He rules
    My wandering thoughts, and shows His love;
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE. (20)

    VI.

    Whose glory none may know in Uttara-mangai bides;
    He in my heart and soul abides;
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE.
    He in my heart abides, Whom Mal and Ayan
    Could not see! How wondorous strange!
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE. (24)

    VII.

    White is His steed, and white His shaven head;
    He wears the sleepers mystic dress.
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE.
    Wearing the sleepers dress, a prancing steed
    He rides, and steals away my soul,
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE. (28)

    VIII.

    He wears the twining-wreath; the sandal paste
    He smears; He rules and makes us His,
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE.
    He makes us His; in lowly servants hands,
    Hark, how the lordly servants hands,
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE. (32)

    IX.

    The fair Ones Half, ascetics garb He wears,
    Enters our homes an alms to ask,
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE.
    He entring alms to ask, my inmost soul
    In sorrow sinks; wherefore is this?
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE. (36)

    X.

    Cassia, the moon, the vilvaflower, and wild
    Phrenzies crowd thick His head,
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE.
    The vilvaflower that crowns His sacred brow
    Wild phrenzy bringeth me to-day,
    MOTHER! SAITH SHE. (40)

    Hymn XVIII- Kuyil pathu

    THE KUYIL-DECAD

    The Kuyilis often referred to in these poems. Our Sage, like St. Francis of Assisi, was exceedingly
    fond of birds, and indeed was filled with love for the whole creation. In this poem he calls upon the
    Kuyil to join him in the praises of his Master, recounting the chief themes on which he was wont to
    dilate. The epithets applied to the Kuyil are skilfully varied; it is pictured to us as a diminutive bird
    haunting the leafy groves; of a dark azure hue with a golden tint; as uttering a sweet call of a
    peculiarly tender kind; as possessed of a beauty gladdening the eye; and as imparting pleasure
    to all that hear its inviting notes. Mystically the Kuyil is the human soul.
    ----
    The Kuyil (or Kokila: Eudynamys indicus) is found in all parts of the peninsula of India, and is
    a great favourite with the people. Its somewhat monotonous cry is more appreciated by the natives
    of the East than by those of the West, yet it is not unpleasing, - in moderation. Its note is sweet
    and plaintive. It must not be confounded with the English cuckoo, though it is of the same species,
    and not unlike it in some particulars.
    -----
    I. Civans infinity.

    O KUYIL, sweet of song, if thou dost seek our Peruman to know;
    If thou wouldst ask of His twain feet; theyre plantedneath the sevenfold gulf.
    Wouldst hear of His bright jewelld crown? Tis glory old that passes speech.
    Nor origin, nor qualities hath He, nor end; CALL HIM TO COME! (4)

    II. His grace to Mandodari.

    Him the fair sevenfold world extols,- since every beings form is His;-
    In southern sea-girt Lanka He, the Lord Who Perun-turrai owns,
    Vandothari the beautiful, made glad with His abounding grace!
    KUYIL, the southern Pandi Chief, CALL HITHER with thy voice divine! (8)

    III. In His capital.

    KUYIL with form of azure hue! In Uttara-koca-mangais shrine,
    Where bright the sacred temple stands, whose storied tenements rise decked with gems,
    One with the graceful Ladys flower-like form in virtue sweetly rich He dwells,-
    The loving Lord by whom the world grows bright,- go thou, and HITHER CALL! (12)

    IV. His voluntary humiliation.

    Thou KUYIL small, that dost frequent the grove with sweet fruit rich, hear this!
    The Gracious-One Who left the heavens, enterd this earth, made men His own;
    The Only-One, despised the flesh, entered my soul, and fills my thought;-
    The Bridegroom of the Fawn-eyed-one that gently rules,- GO HITHER CALL! (16)

    V. His gracious appearing.

    KUYIL, whose beauty is delight! Like sun with circling radiant beams,
    Through upper heaven come down, He frees His saints from thrall of low desire;
    The First, the Midst, the End is He;- the Three knew not His sacred form;-
    His feet are bright with crimson glow;-the mighty Warrior CALL TO COME! (20)

    VI. The manifestation in Madura.

    KUYIL, glad pleasure give I Thee! the sevenfold worlds He rules;-
    The Loving-One ambrosia gives;- the Blissful-God came down from heaven,
    And on the goodly charger rode like jewel set in ruddy gold.
    KUYIL, mid branches twittering, Gokaris Lord GO, CALL TO COME! (24)

    VII. The monarch of the Tamil lands.

    KUYIL, Ill joy in thee, and be thy comrade, ever by the side;-
    Him of the beauteous form Who shines, more choice than gold, in glory bright;
    The King, Who on the horse in splendour rode, in Perun-turrai dwells!-
    The Southern-One, the Ceran, Coran, great Buyangan, CALL TO COME! (28)

    VIII. Arunacalam.

    O tender KUYIL, come thou here! Mal sought Him, and the Four-faced-one,
    Nor found, then ceased, and pondering stood. Cleaving the heaven, in shining fire,
    Beyond all worlds He rose that day, His body like the light rayed out.
    On prancing steed a groom He rode; CALL Him with streaming lock TO COME! (32)

    IX. The gracious initiation.

    KUYIL, thy dark form gleams with gold; thou in the fragrant grove dost joy!
    The Blest, Whose glorious form is bright as splendour of the lotus red,
    On earth, showed us His feet; set free from every bond, and made me His.
    The beauteous cinctured golden Form,th Ambrosial-One, GO CALL TO COME! (36)

    X. His manifestation as a guru.

    Hear this, thou KUYIL, calling midst the grove whose shady boughs enlace!
    A Brahman here He came, revealed His beauteous rosy feet to me.
    This man is one of us, He said, and here in grace made me His own!
    The LORD OF GODS, Whose sacred form is as red fire, GO BID TO COME!

    Hymn XIX- tiruththa saangam

    THE SACRED TEN SIGNS: THE ROYAL INSIGNIA
    I. The Name of the King.

    Parrot fair and tender! soothly tell the glorious Name
    Of Perun-turrais King!- Lord of Arur,- the ruddy Prince,-
    The White-flower-god,-and he of the milky sea praised Him thus:
    Name we our Peruman, the PRINCE OF GODS! (4)

    II. King Civans Land.

    O Emerald, whose blameless speech is sweet! The LAND declare
    Owned by the Lord of all the sevenfold world, Whose own we are.
    He rules His loving ones in love, and gives unfailing grace,
    His LAND is aye the southern PANDI realm! (8)

    III. The city of the King.

    O babbling bird, dweller in flowery grove with fragrance filled!
    What is the TOWN where dwells our Lord, the partner of the Queen?
    The CITY Uttara-koca-mangai named by men devout
    And true, as Civa-town on earth is praisd! (12)

    IV. The Kings River

    Red-mouthd, green-wingd bright bird! Tell us the RIVER of the Sire
    Who makes His home within our heart, great Perun-turrais King!
    O maid, the Masters RIVER is the rapture sent from heaven,
    Come down, the foulness of our mind to cleanse. (16)

    V. The Mountain of the King.

    O parrot purple-mouthd! Tell me the ever-during MOUNT
    Of Perun-turrais King, that hides its head in clouds. -O maid,
    Behold and study well,-His MOUNT is bliss of sweet RELEASE;
    Where the souls darkness flees, and light shines forth. (20)

    VI. The Kings Courser.

    Come hither, parrot mine! and tell, before thou sekst thy cage,
    The Lord of matchless glory, what rides He?-He joyous rides
    Upon the COURSES of the sky;- with honied thought the maids
    Divine attending chaunt melodious praise! (24)

    VII. The Kings Weapon.

    Parrot whose words are honey from the bough! What WEAPON pray
    Oercomes the foes of Perun-turrais blameless King?
    The triple WEAPON that He wields, transfixes threefold sin,
    Causing the souls from malice free to melt. (28)

    VIII. The Kings Drum.

    Parrot, whose words as milk are sweet, tell me the martial DRUM
    That awful sounds before our Perun-turrais King!- In love
    It bids the foe of birth confounded flee,- and makes arise
    All bliss of heaven: the joyous NATHA-DRUM. (32)

    IX.The Kings Garland.

    Parrot, whose word is music, say what is the GARLAND worn
    By Perun-turrais LORD, Who dwells in hearts where love wells up?-
    Who owns me, worthless cur, and daily wards off evil deeds,-
    He wears as WREATH the Tali-arrugu. (36)

    X. The Kings Banner.

    Green parrot of the grove declare, what BANNER glorious waves
    Above the King of Perun-turrais waters pure?- Aloft
    The stainless BANNER of the bull resplendent gleams
    In beauty manifest, while foes flee far. (40)

    Hymn XX- tirupalli yezuchi

    MORNING HYMN IN THE TEMPLE
    or
    THE ROUSING FROM THE SACRED COUCH
    THE FREEDOM OF THE UPLIFTED SOUL.
    I.

    Hail! Being, Source to me of all lifes joys! Tis dawn;
    upon Thy flower-like feet twin wreaths of blooms we lay,
    And worship, neath the beauteous smile of grace benign
    that from Thy sacred face beams on us. Civa-Lord,
    Who dwellst in Perun-turrai girt with cool rice-fields,
    where mid the fertile soil th expanding lotus blooms!
    Thou on Whose lifted banner is the Bull! Master!
    Our mighty Lord! FROM OFF THY COUCH IN GRACE ARISE! (4)

    ----
    The image of the god is laid upon a couch each evening, and taken up in the morning. This
    reveilleis the first business of the day. This was composed in Perun-turrai, the great harbour,
    where the poet went to buy horses for his King, and was made a disciple. The bull is Civans
    emblem. He rides on a white bull. It is also on his banner. The bull-headed Nandi, whose image
    is everywhere in South India, is his Lord High Chamberlain.
    ----
    II.

    The sun has neared the eastern bound; darkness departs;
    dawn broadens out; and, like that sun, the tenderness
    Of Thy blest faces flower uprising shines; and so,
    while bourgeons forth the fragrant flower of Thine eyes beam,
    Round the Kings dwelling fair hum myriad swarms of bees.
    See, Civa-Lord, in Perun-turrais hallowed shrine Who dwellst!
    Mountain of bliss, treasures of grace Who comst to yield!
    O surging Sea! FROM OFF THY COUCH IN GRACE ARISE! (8)

    III.

    The tender Kuyils note is heard; the cocks have crowed;
    the little birds sing out; sound loud the tuneful shells;
    Starlights have paled; days lights upon the eastern hill
    are mustering. In favouring love O show to us
    Thy twin feet, anklet-decked, divinely bright;-
    Civa-Lord, in Perun-turrais hallowed shrine Who dwellst!
    Thee all find hard to know; easy to us Thine own!
    Our mighty Lord! FROM OFF THY COUCH IN GRACE ARISE! (12)

    IV.

    There stand the players on the sweet-voiced lute and lyre;
    there those that utter praises with the Vedic chaunt;
    There those whose hands bear wreaths of flowers entwined;
    there those that bend, that weep, in ecstasy that faint;
    There those that clasp above their heads adoring hands;-
    Civa-Lord, in Perun-turrais hallowed shrine Who dwellst!
    Me too make Thou Thine own, on me sweet grace bestow!
    Our mighty Lord! FROM OFF THY COUCH IN GRACE ARISE! (16)

    V.

    Thou dwellst in all the elements, tis said; and yet
    Thou goest not, nor comst; the sages thus have sung
    Their rhythmic songs. Though neither have we heard nor learnt
    of those that Thee by seeing of the eye have known.
    Thou King of Perun-turrai, girt with cool rice-fields,
    to ponder Thee is hard to human thought. To us
    In presence come! Cut off our ills! In mercy make us Thine!
    Our mighty Lord! FROM OFF THY COUCH IN GRACE ARISE! (20)

    VI.

    Thy saints, who sinless in Thy home abide and know,
    have come, their bonds cast off; and now, a mighty host,
    With beauteous garlands decked, and clothed in human shape,
    they all adore Thee, Bridegroom of the Goddess dread!
    Civa-Lord, Who dwellst in Perun-turrais hallowd shrine,
    girt with cool rice-fields, where th empurpled lotus blooms!
    Cut off this birth, make us Thine own, bestow Thy grace!
    Our mighty Lord! FROM OFF THY COUCH IN GRACE ARISE! (24)

    VII.

    The flavour of the fruit is that; ambrosia that;
    thats hard; this easy: thus Immortals too know not!
    This is His sacred form; this is Himself: that we
    may say and know, make us Thine own; in grace arise!
    In Uttara-koca-mangais sweet perfumed groves
    Thou dwellst! O King of Perun-turrais hallowed shrine!
    What service Thou demandest, Lo! we willing pay.
    Our mighty Lord! FROM OFF THY COUCH IN GRACE ARISE! (28)

    VIII.

    Before all being First, the Midst, the Last art Thou.
    The Three know not Thy nature: how should others know?
    Thou, with Thy tender Spouse, Thy servants lowly huts
    in grace didst visit, entering each, Supernal One!
    Like ruddy fire Thou once didst show Thy sacred form;
    didst show me Perun-turrais temple, where Thou dwellst;
    As Anthanan didst Thyself, and make me Thine.
    Ambrosia rare! FROM OFF THY COUCH IN GRACE ARISE! (32)

    IX.

    The gods in heaven who dwell may not approach Thy seatt!
    O Being worthiest! Yet us who at Thy foot.
    Pay homage, Thou to earth descending, madest blest.
    Dweller in fertile Perun-turrais shrine! our eyes
    Beheld Thee; honied sweetness made our being glad.
    Ambrosia of the sea! Sweetest of sweets! Thou art
    Within Thy longing servants thought! -Soul of this world!-
    Our mighty Lord! FROM OFF THY COUCH IN GRACE ARISE! (36)

    X.

    Said sacred Mal and flower-born Ayan as they gazed
    on Civans form, This day in vain we spend and cry.
    Tis time we went to earth and there were born. Tis earth,
    tis earth alone where Civans grace is wont to save.
    Thou King, Who dwellst in Perun-turrais hallowd shrine,
    mighty Thou wert to enter earth, and make us Thine!
    Thou and the Grace, that flower-like blooms from forth Thy form,
    Ambrosia rare! FROM OFF THY COUCH IN GRACE ARISE! (40)

    Hymn XXI- koyin muutha tirupathikam

    THE ANCIENT SACRED TEMPLE-SONG
    or
    ETERNAL REALITY.
    I.

    The Mistress dwells in midmost of Thyself;
    within the Mistress centred dwellest Thou;
    Midst of Thy servant if Ye Both do dwell,
    to me Thy servant ever give the grace
    Amidst Thy lowliest servants to abide;
    our Primal Lord, Whose Being knows no end,
    Who dwellest in the sacred golden porch,
    still present to fulfil my hearts intent!
    (4)

    II. I have not swerved

    Eerwhile in presence here Thou madst me Thine;
    and I even so to be with effort strain:
    I follow Thee, and Thy behests fulfil;
    but still I here behind am left, great Lord!
    If Thou appear not now in grace, and bid
    me come, will not Thy servants doubting say,
    And who was he that stood erewhile with Thee,
    Who joyest in the golden hall to dance? (8)

    III.

    He joyd erewhile in loving service done,-
    if I, with heart of feeling reft made hard
    By grief, complain, for all the world to know,-
    will they not say, This is no fitting thing?
    Thy faithful ones, the sacrifice performed,
    now dwell in bliss with Thee, and Thou with them.
    If Thou Thy face to me turn not, I die,-
    lifes SOurce, Who dwellest in the golden court! (12)

    IV.

    Thou Source of All! Guide to the senses five;
    and to the Three; to me, too, in lifes way!
    Thine ancient servants thronging multitude
    is gathered now within the heavenly courts.
    Fount of all brightness! Thou hast given them grace;
    shall I not cry, To me show pity too?
    And so I weep,- what other can I do?-
    Thou King of Tillais sacred court of gold! (16)

    V.

    King, Dancer in the golden court,
    Ambrosia, - looking for Thy grace,- I cry.
    Like patient heron watching for its prey,
    by night and day, I drooping bide and mourn
    Thy saints have reached the shore,- in joy they shine;
    to me if Thou deny that vision bright,-
    Like butter hidden in the curdled milk,;(br>
    still silent, will not they reproach? (20)

    VI.

    Even they will heap reproach upon my name,
    revile, and scoffing point me out as Thine;
    While others all will utter various speech;
    but I will cherish yearnings for Thy grace.
    Teacher!- that I amid Thy loving ones
    may render service in the sacred hall,-
    Faher!- Who dances in the golden court,-
    henceforth, O ruler, pity show to me! (24)

    VII.

    Show pity, Dancer in the golden court,
    with ever-yearning soul I pray. Of old,
    Rare teaching didst Thou give, and madst me Thine!
    Shall I become mere beast, with none to own?
    Thy saints around Thee throng, where Thou and they,
    in happy sport commingled, ever dwell.
    That I may thither rise to join the band,
    our only Bliss, in grace O bid me come! (28)

    VIII. Whom have I save Thee?

    Grace if Thou show not to Thy servant, who
    is here to bid me cast away my fears?
    All gold, Thou entering here, madst me Thine own,
    as thing of worth; Dancer in court of gold!
    Me, from Thee severed, with bewildered mind,
    and troubled sore, ah! bid to come to Thee.
    If Thou show not Thy glorious fellowhip,
    I die; and then will not men scoff? (32)

    IX. The joys of Civans paradise.

    They smile, they joy, honied delights they quaff,
    in thronging crowds Thy words expound and hear,
    And loud extol. Then each apart repeats
    the saving mystery of Thy sacred Name.
    Our Head, Who dancest in the golden court,
    they cry. before these blessed ones, shall I
    Like dog, that jackals chase and scare, remain?
    My Teacher, even now bestow Thy grace!

    X. Let not my trust be vain!

    He will not cease to pour on us His gifts,-
    thus have I raving named Thy Name,
    My eyes with tears were filld,- my praising mouth
    falterd,- I bowd, - in thought with melting soul
    Many a time Thine image I recalled,-
    and uttering praises named the golden court.
    My Master, grant Thy grace to me, and oh!
    have pity on the soul that pines for Thee! (36)

    Hymn XXII- koyitr trirupathikam

    THE SACRED TEMPLE-LYRIC.
    [AN ANAPHORETIC DECAD.]
    THE CHARACTERISTICS OF SACRED ENJOYMENT.
    I. Show me Thy Face.

    With changing wiles the senses five bewilder me:
    their course Thou dost close up, Ambrosial Fount!
    Come, Light Suprene, that ever springing fillst my soul!
    and give me grace to see Thee as Thou art.
    Essential Sweetness pure! O mighty Civa-Peruman,
    Who dwellst in Perun-turrais sacred shrine!
    O Thou, the bliss all endless happy stations yield,
    transcending far, my Pleasure and my LOVE! (4)

    II. Praise for grace imparted

    In LOVE, Thy servants soul and body thrilling through,
    and melting all my heart with rapturous bliss,
    Thou hast bestowed sweet grace beyond my beings powers;-
    and I for this have no return to give!
    Thou art before! Thou art behind! Thou art the Free,
    through all diffusd! Thou First, without and end!
    South--Perun-turrais Lord! O CIva-Peruman!
    Civa-Purams ever-glorious KING! (8)

    III.Inspire me to feel and utter the very truth regarding Thee.

    O KING, the slave of Thine own loving ones am I.
    Father! not soul alone but body too,
    Thou enterest melting, and with sweetness fillst each pore.
    Thou dost disperse false darkness, O true Light!
    Ambrosial Sea, whose clearness knows no ruffling wave!
    Civan, Who dwellst in Perun-turrais shrine! Thou Thought unique, thinking what passes word and thought!
    teach me to KNOW the way to speak of Thee! (12)

    IV.

    Sages that KNOW all else; the heavnly ones and all
    the others, scarce can KNOW Thee, Being rare!
    Life of all lives, with none confused! My healing Balm,
    that from Embodiments my spirit frees!
    Pure Light, clear shining mid the darkness dense!
    Civan, Who dwellst in Perun-turrais shrine!
    O Bliss, of qualities devoid! Henceforth to me,
    who have to Thee drawn nigh, what can there LACK? (16)

    V.

    Fulness, that knows no LACK; ambrosial Essence pure!
    O unscaled mount of ever-blazing light!
    Thou art the Veda,- Thou the mystic Vedas sense.
    Within my mind Thou coming, bidst its Lord!
    As torrents burst their bounds, Thou rushest through my soul!
    Civan, Who dwellst in Perun-turrais shrine!
    O King, my body hast Thou made Thine home; henceforth
    what blessings shall Thy suppliant ASK of Thee? (20)

    VI.

    That I may ever ASK and melt, within my mind,
    O Light, Thou dost arise! In beauty shines
    On heavenly heads the lotus of Thy roseate feet!
    Civan, who dwellst in Perun-turrais shrine!
    The boundless ether, water, earth, fire, air;- all these
    Thou art; and none of these Thou art; but dwellst
    In these conceald, O formless One! My heart is glad
    that with these eves THIS DAY Ive seen Thee clear! (24)

    VII.

    THIS DAY on me in grace Thou risest bright, a Sun,
    bidding from out my mind the darkness flee!
    That thought may cease upon Thy nature manifest,
    I think. Beside Thee all that is is nought,-
    Moving ever,- as atoms ever wasting,- Thou art One!
    Civan, Who dwellst in Perun-turrrais shrine!
    Thou art not anything; without Thee nothing is;
    who are they that can know Thee as Thou art? (28)

    VIII.

    Expanse of light, that everywhere through every world,
    oer earth and heaven springs forth and spread alone !
    Thou Fire in water hid! O Pure One, if of Thee
    we think, Thourt hard to reach. Fountain of grace,
    Upsprining in the thought devout, as honey sweet!
    Civan, in Perun-turrais sacred shrine
    Who dwellst,- who are my kindered here, and strangers who?
    my LIGHT. Thou changest all to rapturous joy! (32)

    IX.

    O Form, beheld in radiant LIGHT made manifest;
    Thou only Mystic Ones Who wearst no form;
    Thou First! Thou Midst! Thou Last! Great Sea of rapturous joy!
    Thou that dost loose our beings bonds!
    Thou sacred Hill of grace and good, from evil free!
    Civan in sacred Perun-turrais shrine
    Who dwellst! There is no way for Thee to part from me!
    Come, GIVE to me worship at Thy feet! (36)

    X.

    What Thou hast GIVEN is THEE; and what hast gained is ME:
    O Cankara, who is the knowing one?
    I have obtained the rapturous bliss that knows no end;
    yet now, what one thing hast Thou gained from me?
    Our Peruman, Who for Thy shrine hast taen my thought!
    Civan, Who dwellst in Perun-turrais courts!
    My Father, and my Master! Thou hast made this frame
    Thine home; for this I know no meet return! (40)

    Hymn XXIII- sethila pathu

    WEARINESS OF LIFE

    (THE INFINITY OF BLISS IN CIVAN.)
    I. Severd from Thee I cannot live.

    I, false, am severd from the flowry feet that, entering here,
    made my soul melt, distilling nectar sweet.
    Yet I, poor wretch, die not as yet; but, in a waking dream,
    the inner purpose of my soul Ive lost.
    O Teacher,- King, - Great Sea of grace, - Father,- Whose roseate form
    Ayan and Mal could never come to know,-
    I know not what to do, O CIVAN, Thou Who didst draw near
    IN SACRED PERUN-TURRAIS SHRINE TO DWELL! (4)

    II. Still I wander here.

    Ant-hills were they, and trees were they; water and air
    their food; thus heavenly ones, and others too,
    Were sore distress, but none Thy flowry feet beheld,
    O King! Me, mastered with a single word,
    Thou heldst erewhile. I pant not now, nor melt in mind subdued;
    I feel no love devout; this loveless frame
    Ive not subdued; I wander yet, CIVAN, Who didst draw near
    IN SACRED PERUN-TURRAIS SHRINE TO DWELL! (8)

    III. Where are my old joys?

    Evn me, the meanest one, Thou didst as thing of worth regard,
    and gavst Thy grace; and giving madst me glad.
    I trod on air, O Rider of the Steed! _Author of good!
    To all heavens countless hosts the Dwelling-place!
    Eternal One! Who atest poison from the billowy sea!
    The cities of Thy foes Thou didst consume!
    Bowman! -Command that I should die,- CIVAN, Who didst draw near
    AND DWELLST IN SACRED PERUN-TURRAIS SHRINE! (12)

    IV. Why didst Thou make me Thine?

    Thy loving ones, and those who wrought hard deeds of penitence,
    Ayan and Mal too, joyous, melted then
    Like wax before the fire, thinking on me; while many a one
    here stood around! Why didst Thou make me Thine?
    My mind was like the gnarld and knotted tree; like senseless wood
    my eye; harder than iron my dull ear.
    Thou rulst the south-shore! Lord of Civa-world, Who didst draw near
    IN SACRED PERUN-TURRAIS SHRINE TO DWELL! (16)

    V. I know no other gods but Thee.

    Ive left the law of sportive gods. In love I neared Thee, named
    Thee Teacher;- in Thy gracious way Ill bide.
    O Being rare,- Whom evn the earth-born gods find out,- that Thee
    I may not quit, O Ruler, show me grace!
    Show me Thy jewelld feet, O God; bodys illusions all
    be by Thy grace for ever swept away.
    Lord of the gods that rule the evolving gods! CIVAN, our God
    WHO DWELLST IN SACRED PERUN-TURRAIS SHRINE! (20)

    VI. I cannot endure this severance

    I loose not bodys bonds, nor enter fire to end the strife;
    nor know the method of Thy sacred grace.
    I cannot bear this frame; yet way to scape I none discern.
    Praise, praise, Thou Rider on the warlike bull!
    I die not yet! severd from Thee what pleasure can I take?
    In grace vouchsafe to bid me, This do thou!
    CIVAN, Who didst draw near where waters flood the fertile fields,
    AND DWELLST IN SACRED PERUN-TURRAIS SHRINE! (24)

    VII. I am not worthy, yet hear my voice!

    Illusionst; Who atst the poison from the refluent sea;-
    heavens Lord; our azure-throated Balm of life!
    A cur, I cannot ponder Thee, nor bow me at Thy foot,
    Nama-Civaya humbly breathing out!
    Vile as a demon I, - show me Thy mighty way, Thou oer
    Whose braided lock wanders the crescent moon,-
    Beseems it far from Thee I roaming weep? CIVAN, Who camst
    IN SACRED PERUN-TURRAIS SHRINE TO DWELL! (28)

    VIII. Can my sufferings be pleasing to Thee?

    Ayan who in the lotus dwells, the Sleeper on the warring sea,
    Purandaran, and all the rest, stood round.
    From dregs of ill Thou madst me clean, showing Thy jewelld feet;
    didst give the sign, and with Thy servants join!
    Then sore amazed I knew not what to do. Balm of my soul,
    and is it sweet Thy servant suffer pain?
    CIVAN, Who didst draw nigh where cooling waers flow around the fields,
    AND DWELLST IN SACRED PERUN-TURRAIS SHRINE! (32)

    IX. Is there no place for me among Thy saints?

    Indra, the Four-faced, and the heavenly Ones stood round,- on earth
    with tender sweetness then Thou madst me Thine,-
    Thou of the flowry Foot, that took the life from Death;
    Ganga is Thine; the fire burns in Thy hand;
    And Mal, in triumph-songs, to that same flower-foot sings;
    command me too, whose eye sees not, to come!
    Bright flow the flowry streams around the fields where CIVAN came.
    IN SACRED PERUN-TURRAIS SHRINE TO DWELL! (36)

    X. I languish thinking on heavenly joys

    In tender grace Thou camst and badst me come, didst banish fear;
    then in Thy graces mighty sea I plunged.
    I drank, was sated; now I melt no more, - CIVAN, Who camst
    IN SACRED PERUN-TURRAIS SHRINE TO DWELL!
    He who the armlet wears, and flowery Ayan know Thee not,
    heavens Lord, sole Partner of the Mountain-Maid!
    I wilderd stand, while rising swells the mighty joy, - O SEA
    WHOSE WATERS REST ON KAILAIS LOFTY HILL! (40)

    Hymn XXIV- adaikalap pathu

    THE REFUGE - DECAD
    or
    THE ASSURANCE OF MATURITY.

    -----
    It seems probable that this song was founded upon the Buddhist formula which required the
    devotee to utter nine times the word saranam, three times to Buddha, three times to the law or
    doctrine, and three times to the congregation (=church, or order). This entire abandonment of
    self on the part of the disciple was his initation into the Buddhist system. Here our author takes
    refuge at the foot of the loving Master Who has called him, and will at last receive him to Himself.
    This element of personal devotion to One Whom he believes to have been the Supreme manifested
    in the flesh is very striking, and gives a power that was wanting in the Buddhist system. We must
    remember that all his life our sage was brought into hostile contact with the Buddhists, and that he
    fashions his poems so as to afford the strongest possible contrast to that which he hated.
    -----
    I.

    Thy saints like clustering lotus-flowers have joined Thy roseate foot;
    Mature of mind, with Thee theyre gone; while I, a sinful man,
    In body foul and vile remain, devoid of wisdoms lore,
    Of mind impure. MASTER! THY SLAVE, I THEE MY REFUGE MAKE! (4)

    II.

    My meanness only hateful things can do; Thy greatness still
    Forgives!- The serpent-gem Thou wearst; swells Gangas stream Thy crest;
    Thou, by Thy sacred grace, the root of these my births
    Dost cut away, MASTER! THY SLAVE, I THEE MY REFUGE MAKE! (8)

    III.

    Great Peruman, Thou who dost free from birth! Thou frenzy givst
    O Peruman! - Within my mind, O Peruman the wise,
    Thou comst. The flowry One, and giant Mal too, knew Thee not;
    Rare Peruman! MASTER! THY SLAVE, I THEE MY REFUGE MAKE! (12)

    IV.

    In floods from sorrows pouring clouds that rise, Thy loving ones
    Sinking have seized the raft of Thy blest foot, and risen to heaven.
    Whirld amid troubles sea, where women-billows dash, and lustss
    Sea-monster wounds, I sink. MASTER! I THEE MY REFUGE MAKE! (16)

    V.

    Falln mid the circling troops of them of curling locks; Thy power
    Forgetting; in this body dark I wearied lay. Thou Half
    Of Her with wide balck eyes and glance like startled fawn! Heavens Lord!
    Give me Thy grace! MASTER! THY SLAVE, I THEE MY REFUGE MAKE! (20)

    VI.

    Broken by mighty churning-staff of those of jet black eyes,
    Like cream in churn I bounded, suffered pain. O flowr-foot, Hail!
    When comst Thou? When shall I whose deeds are mighty worship Thee?
    Lord of the Earth! MASTER! THY SLAVE, I THEE MY REFUGE MAKE! (24)

    VII.

    Caught in the net of hot desire for those of glancing eyes
    And slender form, I writhd and rolld in sorrow sore; that I
    Wallow no more, pit my fault, appear, pour sweetest balm!
    Lord of the temple-court! MASTER! I THEE MY REFUGE MAKE! (28)

    VIII.

    Thou Half of Her with beauteous eyes! unto Thy flowry feet
    Thou callst me,- then dismisses me to deepest depths; Thy thought
    I know not. Like pipes changing tones now sinks, now swells my soul.
    Alas! I perish quite! MASTER! I THEE MY REFUGE MAKE! (32)

    IX.

    Thy loving ones beneath Thy jewelld feet that grace confer
    Abiding, gain the bliss that knows no refluent tide. No way
    To worship Thee I find; in sooth I know not Thee, noe lore
    That tells of Thee! MASTER! THY SLAVE, I THEE MY REFUGE MAKE! (36)

    X.

    Eager I took ambrosia of Thy grace so freely pourd;
    I strove to drink; my sinful soul by evil fate was bound!
    Give me to taste the rare stream gushing honey-sweet, and save!
    I sink in woe! MASTER! THY SLAVE, I THEE MY REFUGE MAKE! (40)

    Hymn XXV- aasai pathu

    THE DECAD OF DESIRE
    or
    KNOWLEDGE OF SELF
    I. I long for Thy summons,

    O flawless Gem, who gavst the wealth of Thine own roseate feet,-
    By the kite-bannerd King unseen,- and here madst me Thine own!
    My darkness drive far off; say hither come! The grace to gain
    That calls me there to dwell, BEHOLD, O SIRE, MY SOUL HATH YEARND! (4)

    II. Weary of the flesh

    I not endure to wear this garment of the flesh,- of joints
    And bones compact,- with fatness filled,-covered with skin! O King,
    Call me! To men of every sort, as fits their case Thou comst
    Ambrosia rare, ah, Thee to see, BEHOLD, O SIRE, I YEARN! (8)

    III. Let me hear Thy call.

    Call me, my King, that this poor frame, with vileness filld, may die!
    Thou Dancer, Guru-gem, Who guarding makest me Thine;
    O God by gods unreachd! Civan! Look on my face awhile.
    For Thee, to hear Thee call, BEHOLD, O SIRE, MY SOUL HATH YEARND! (12)

    IV. I wait in humble hope.

    This walking cell, with loathy filth filled full, contemptible,
    Clings to me, and afflicts my soul! Hail to Thee, mighty Lord!
    Broken, subdued, and melted, looking ever for Thy light,
    Thy blest feets flower to gain, BEHOLD, O SIRE, MY SOUL HATH YEARND! (16)

    V. Where are the old joys?

    Within this frame is loathsome; and without skin-covered sores,
    Sore grief! Thou Rider on the Bull! Bedeckt with ashes white,
    Stooping to me, Thou camst, and madst me Thine; Ambrosia rare!
    For word of tenderness, BEHOLD, O SIRE, MY SOUL HATH YEARND! (20)

    VI. I long for the life of heaven,

    Weary, mere dog, I cannot here abide. Take back earths joys
    Thou gavst, O Thou whose roseate teet-flowers heavens sons know not!
    Thou knowst no bond! Thy faces light, the gleaming of Thy smile,-
    To see, BEHOLD, O SIRE, HOW EAGERLY MY SOUL HATH YEARND! (24)

    VII. I long to praise Thee there

    Thou Infinite, Whom earth and heaven extol, Thou Light superne,-
    Thou camst to make me Thine! Give me the world of final bliss;
    Thy thousand names Id circling sing. Thee mighty Lord to praise,
    Th Ambrosia ever new, BEHOLD, O SIRE, MY SOUL HATH YEARND! (28)

    VIII. My whole being worships Thee.

    With hands Thee worshipping, embracing close Thy jewelld feet,
    And placing still unwearied on my head, Our Lord, our Lord, I cry;-
    My Teacher, with my mouth I cry. Like wax before the fire,
    King of Aiyarr! BEHOLD, O SIRE, MY MELTING SOUL HATH YEARND! (32)

    IX. When shall I join Thy saints?

    To cast quite off this sinful frame; to enter Civans home;
    To see the Wondrous Light, that so these eyes may gladness gain;
    O Infinite, without compare! Th assembly of Thy saints
    Of old, to see, BEHOLD, O SIRE, THY SERVANTS SOUL HATH YEARND! (36)

    X. Thy voice stills passion

    Caught in the net of passion fierce by those whose eyes shine bright,
    I languishd,- I a cur,- O light of truth! and saw no help.
    Thou Half of Her with gentle foot!- Thou only One! To hear
    Thee say with coral lips, Fear not, BEHOLD, O SIRE, MY SOUL HATH YEARND! (40)

    Hymn XXVI- athisiya pathu

    THE DECAD OF WONDER
    (RELEASE)
    I.

    With melting mind I said not, He is gold, His is a rubys light;
    I languishd pondering charms of damsels young. Boon indescribable,
    Mercies beyond compare, to me were given; He of the flowery foot,
    THE FATHER, MADE ME HIS, AND JOINED ME TO HIS SAINTS:
    SUCH WONDER HAVE WE SEEN! (4)

    II.

    Of righteous deeds I had no thought, nor joined those who think on these;
    To sorrows born and deaths, I wandered here. He said, This is my slave.
    He, the Supernal, stood in nearness manifest,- His half, the Queen.
    THE FIRST ONE MADE ME HIS, AND JOINED ME TO HIS SAINTS:
    SUCH WONDER HAVE WE SEEN! (8)

    III.

    Aforetime, that my mighty deeds might pass, the Father tiple-eyed,-
    Whom all find hard to know, to servant-bands abundantly revealed,-
    Who placd the crescent moon on braided lock of more than golden sheen,
    THE SIRE,- HE MADE ME HIS, AND JOIND ME TO HIS SAINTS:
    SUCH WONDER HAVE WE SEEN! (12)

    IV.

    Perpend the one sole cause for which the world a madman nameth me:
    I livd as others, knew no way to join me to His grce divine;
    To deaths, to fallings into direful hells. I gave myself a prey.
    THE FATHER, MADE ME HIS, AND JOIND ME TO HIS SAINTS:
    SUCH WONDER HAVE WE SEEN! (16)

    V.

    I hasted not to join the choirs; I pluckd no flowers nor worshipped;
    A slave to charms of those of perfumd locks I squanderd gifts of life.
    By night our King dances midmost the fires,- the snake amidst His braided hair!
    HE MADE ME HIS, AND JOIND ME TO HIS SAINTS:
    SUCH WONDER HAVE WE SEEN! (20)

    VI.

    Through my mere folly I the Letters Five forgot, that speak His sacred Name;
    I drew not near those wise in lore divine, longing to share their virtuous deeds.
    Born on the earth and dying there mere thing of earth, to earth I gave myself!
    THE MIGHTY MADE ME HIS, AND JOIND ME TO HIS SAINTS:
    SUCH WONDER HAVE WE SEEN! (24)

    VII.

    This but untrue, whose walls are flesh, worm-stuffed, decayd, dripping with all thats foul,-
    This did I take for true, whirled round in sorrows sea. He Who of rarest gem,
    Of pearl, of ruby, adamant, and coral red,- the gleaming splendour wears,-
    MY FATHER, MADE ME HIS, AND JOIND ME TO HIS SAINTS:
    SUCH WONDER HAVE WE SEEN! (28)

    VIII.

    Erewhile, that I no more mightbide with Him, He sent, and placd me in this cell.
    He lookd on me, spake gentlest words of mystery; brake off the yoke; His hand
    Upraised, made former falesness cease, removed all fault, filled me with gleaming light:
    TWAS THUS HE MADE ME HIS, AND JOIND ME TO HIS SAINTS:
    SUCH WONDER HAVE WE SEEN! (32)

    IX.

    Like fragrance hid within the blooming flower, the meaning of this frame
    No mortal mind can reach: the Being infinite. That Being I knew not.
    I trusted words of fools that pluck the fruit of deeds. From sensual snare to save
    THE FATHER, MADE ME HIS, AND JOIND ME TO HIS SAINTS:
    SUCH WONDER HAVE WE SEEN! (36)

    X.

    This hut, with darkness dense, the fruit of mighty deeds, I took for wonderful,
    Rejoiced, and so was falling into deepest hell. He gave my soul true light!
    He that with angry foot and ruddy fire forthwith the triple walls threw down
    The true way showed to me in grace, the false destroyed:
    SUCH WONDER HAVE WE SEEN! (40)

    Hymn XXVII- punarchi pathu

    THE DECAD OF MYSTIC UNION
    or
    THE NATURE OF RELEASE
    I. When shall I reach the Inaccessible?

    The gleaming golden Hill, the flawless Pearl, the Shrine of tender love
    Who made me, last of man, His own, in speechless service glad! He Whom
    Dark Mal and Brahma baffled yet approach not,- gave Himself, rare Balm!
    When shall I dwell in MYSTIC UNION JOINED WITH HIM, MY FLAWLESS GEM? (4)

    II. My soul cries out for Thy rest.

    Thy servant I endure not, O my king, upon this earth in mire
    Of fivefold sense! In thought adoring Civan as my Lord,
    With mind that melts, like sands where waters spring, with cries of jubilee,
    When shall I praise, in MYSTIC UNION JOINED WITH HIM, MY FLAWLESS GEM? (8)

    III. When shall I join the happy saints?

    While lofty Mal and Ayan feard, a hill of fire Who rose, He loveless me
    Made His! Ambrosia rare! Amid His saints, whose souls gush out with love,
    To hearts content, my praise outpouring, wreathd with fragrant flowers,
    When shall I lie, in MYSTIC UNION JOINED WITH HIM, MY FLAWLESS GEM? (12)

    IV. His blissful presence.

    With Ayan of the Lotus, Mal, and all the rest,- with the Immortalss King,
    Speak praises to Him name! The Light surpassing speech and words intent!
    The NellisFruit; Milk, Honey, Balm with sweetness filld;- Ambrosia pure.
    When shall I clasp, in MYSTIC UNION JOINED WITH HIM, MY FLAWLESS GEM? (16)

    V. Hidden from gods, to me revealed.

    To see the foot and crown, that gleam with light, Ayan and Mal, down deep,
    Up high, they dug, they flew; but could not see His form! While all this earth
    Stood round, my service claimed, made me His own, and bade me come! His love
    When shall I praise, in MYSTIC UNION JOINED WITH HIM, MY FLAWLESS GEM? (20)

    VI. When shall I recover the old rapture?

    In love He came, and rapture gave in olden days, to me His slave!
    And then He left me on this wide vast earth to wander wildered!
    With floods of gushing tears, and frame with transport thrilled, in joy and love,
    When shall I stand, in MYSTIC UNION JOINED WITH HIM, MY FLAWLESS GEM? (24)

    VII. When shall I know Him?

    Hard to others thought, thourt fire, water, wind, earth, ether; Him,
    Sole One to whom none can compare; in joy beholding, praising loud,
    While tears in torrents flow, adoring hand out-stretched, fragrant flower-wreaths
    When shall I bring, in MYSTIC UNION JOINED WITH HIM, MY FLAWLESS GEM? (28)

    VIII. The heavenly re-union.

    In bliss dissold, soul melted utterly, with every gesture meet:
    Laughter and tears, homage of hand and lip,- with every mystic dance,-
    To see with joyous thrill, that Sacred Form, like ruddy evening sky,
    When shall I pass, in MYSTIC UNION JOINED WITH HIM, MY FLAWLESS GEM? (32)

    IX. Parvathi praised as one with Civan.

    Sire and Mother of the seven worlds old; Who me, a dog, madst Thine;
    Thee only Balm for woes of life; Thee wisdoms honey-dripping Gem,
    For ever praising,- night and day. Thy beauteous foot with flowry wreaths
    When shall I deck, in MYSTIC UNION JOINED WITH HIM, MY FLAWLESS GEM? (36)

    X. His eternity.

    Thou guardst, creatst, destroyst; midst all that fill the spacious heaven
    The ELDER Thou, and First, Who knows no eld; Brahman, Who madst me Thine;
    Thou Infinite! For ever singing, bowing low, Thy foots fair flower
    When shall I clasp, in MYSTIC UNION JOINED WITH HIM, MY FLAWLESS GEM? (40)

    Hymn XXVIII- vaazhap pathu

    NO JOY IN LIFE
    I. Longing for release.

    Transcendent One, extending through both earth and heaven,
    THOU SEEST TO NONE BUT THEE I CLING!-
    O Civa-purams King! In glorious beauty bright,
    Civan, in holy Perun-turrais shrine,
    Who dwellst! To whom make I my plaint, whom blame, if Thou
    Who madst me Thine deny Thy grace?
    THOU SEEST NO JOY have I upon this sea-girt earth;
    BE GRACIOUS, BID ME COME TO THEE! (4)

    II.

    Me, worthless one, Thou madst in grace Thine own, great Gem,-
    THOU SEEST TO NONE BUT THEE I CLING!-
    Whose form unique even those in yonder world know not,
    past thought of both,- all piercing power
    Thou art, the glorious Lord! O Civa-purams King!
    Civan, in Perun-turrais shrine
    Who dwellst our mighty Lord, Thou Ruler of my soul,
    BE GRACIOUS, BID ME COME TO THEE! (8)

    III.

    That foot alone I seek that Mal in songs extolled;
    THOU SEEST TO NONE BUT THEE I CLING!-
    Thou soughtst me, madst me Thine, O Civa-purams King!
    Civan, in Perun-turrais shrine
    Who dwellst. Though I complain, in Thee my soul delights;
    to gain anew Thy love my thought;
    Thou seest my heart is faint, I have no joy in life;
    BE GRACIOUS, BID ME COME TO THEE! (12)

    IV.

    Thou Who the gleaming rebel-town didst swift consume,
    THOU SEEST TO NONE BUT THEE I CLING!-
    Dancer, Who bidst in Tillai, Civa-purams King!
    Civan, in Perun-turrais shrine
    Who dwellst, the three worlds bounds that day the twain passd through,
    and saw nor first nor last of Thee,
    In might so didst Thou rise! Thou seest I joy not here;-
    BE GRACIOUS, BID ME COME TO THEE! (16)

    V. Absolute self-surrender.

    Partner of Her whose words are sweetest melody!
    THOU SEEST TO NONE BUT THEE I CLING!-
    Surely Thou madst me Thine, O Civa-purams King!
    Civan, in holy Perun-turrais shrine
    Who dwellst,- the whole: my body, mouth, nose, ears, and eyes:-
    all these in Thy control I place.
    THOU SEEST THY SERVANT HATH NO JOYS UPON THIS EARTH;-
    BE GRACIOUS, BID ME COME TO THEE! (20)

    VI. The senses power.

    Partner of Her with footfall downy soft,
    THOU SEEST TO NONE BUT THEE I CLING!-
    Thou madst me wholly Thine, O Civa-purams King!
    Civan, in Perun-turrais shrine
    Who dwellst,- me trembling cur, Thou madst Thine own; that grace
    through senses perturbation I forgot;
    THOU SEEST THAT IN DECEPTION LOST, I JOY NOT HERE;-
    BE GRACIOUS, BID ME COME TO THEE! (24)

    VII.

    Thou Light, that shinst a Sun through all the spheres,
    THOU SEEST TO NONE BUT THEE I CLING!-
    Sacred, supremely glorious Civa-Purams King!
    Civan, in Perun-turrais shrine
    Who dwellst, Thee I see; - my melting soul dissolves,
    wilderd I know not any way in life to joy.
    THOU SEEST I, FOLLYS CHILD, CAN IN THIS LIFE PARTAKE NO JOY,
    BE GRACIOUS, BID ME COME TO THEE! (28)

    VIII.

    Partner of Her whose fingers jewels rare adorn,
    THOU SEEST TO NONE BUT THEE I CLING!-
    Thou art like ruddy flame, O Civa-purams King!
    Civan, in Perun-turrais shrine
    Who dwellst,- endless Ambrosia,- Essence rare and great,-
    Ambrosia rare,- Thy servant Thou didst save,
    And madst me Thine, IN LIFE I CANNOT JOY THOU SEEST;
    BE GRACIOUS, BID ME COME TO THEE! (32)

    IX.

    Thourt sins Destroyer, save Thy healing foot alone,
    THOU SEEST TO NOUGHT BESIDE I CLING!-
    God of all gods, O Civa-purams King! Civan,
    in sacred Perun-turrais shrine Who dwellst
    Through the three worlds passing, above below the twain,
    as roaring flame Thou didst uplift Thy form.
    Lord of the bull! THOU SEEST IN LIFE I CANNOT JOY;
    BE GRACIOUS, BID ME COME TO THEE! (36)

    X.

    Partner of Her, Thy bride, of faultless old renown,
    THOU SEEST TO NONE BUT THEE I CLING!-
    Thou wearst the crescent moon, O Civa-purams King!
    Civan, in sacred Perun-turrais shrine
    Who dwellst,- shall I bow down to others? shall I praise?
    or may think them aids for me? speak Thou!
    Lord of the youthful bull! THOU SEEST I KNOW NO JOY;
    BE GRACIOUS, BID ME COME TO THEE! (40)

    Hymn XXIX- arut pathu

    THE DECAD OF GRACE
    or
    CLEANSING FROM DELUSION.

    ----
    The T.V.U.P states that this was one of the earliest of the Sages poems, and that it was sung at
    Tiru-perun-turrai. It certainly bears the impress of youth, and in many respects is inferior to some of
    his later poems. It is said to have for its subject the purification of the soul from the great delusion
    (Maha-maya). What this is can only be known by a careful study of the Caiva Siddhanta philosophy.

    The metre is the same as in XXII, and is very sweet. In each stanza, the two latter lines nearly
    correspond throughout the whole poem, an epithet or two being changed. Civan is addressed as the
    god who appeared in the Triclinia (Kuruntham) grove near Tiru-perun-turrai, and about thirty different
    epithets are applied to him, some of which are mere repetitions. The epithets applied to Tiru-perun-turrai
    are also varied. The last line in each stanza contains a Telugu phrase equivalent to and what is that?
    so that the line literally reads: Save Thou in grace, saying what is that? or in other words,
    What is there to fear? fear not. The poet is complaining of the power of earthborn delusions,
    and prays the god to take away his anxious fears. I cannot trace any sequence in the thought
    from stanza to stanza.

    In the Siddhanta, very great stress is laid upon the idea that all embodiment, while it is painful
    and to be got rid of as soon as possible, is yet a gracious appointment of Civan, wrought out through
    Cakti, for the salvation of the human soul through the destruction of deeds, which are the root of
    all evil to mankind. Now the Buddhist formula represents suffering as being the whole account of
    the matter: Birth is suffering, old age is suffering, sickness is suffering, death is suffering.
    The origin of suffering is the thirst for pleasure, being, and power. The extinction of this thirst
    brings about the extinction of suffering. The Caiva Siddhanta doctrine, on the contrary, gives to
    life and sufering a real significance. The present life is a probation,- a purgatory,- a preparation
    for endless fellowship and communion with the Supreme. Thus Grace is recognised where the
    Buddhist sees only suffering; and the instrument of mans release is that wisdom which understands
    the divine purpose, and adapts itself to that purpose. Our Sage dwells much upon the value of prayer,
    and of humble worship paid to the divine guru, while in Buddhism all is to be done by unaided human
    effort. At every point the two systems are in directest opposition!
    ----
    I.

    O Light! O Lamp girt with effulgent beams!-
    the dame with curling locks and beauteous form
    Is Thine, Supreme, Who wearst the milk-white ash!
    The Just, Whom Ayan of the flower knew not,
    Nor Mal! In happy Perun-turrai Thou
    neath the Kurunthams flowry shade didst rest.
    Great First of Beings! when I craving call,
    BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANTS FEARS BEGONE! (4)

    II.

    O Dancer! Spotless One! O ash-besmeard!
    Thy brow hath central eye! Lord of heavens host!
    Sole Deity! through all the world Thyself
    I sought lamenting loud, but found Thee not.
    Thou, Who by Perun-turrais pleasant lake
    neath the Kurunthams flowry shade didst rest.
    Great Source of Being! when Thy servant craving calls,
    BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANTS FEARS BEGONE! (8)

    III.

    Our Leader! Ruler of my life and soul!
    Whom ladies twain, with perfumd flowing locks,
    Claim as their Spouse! Lord of the firy eye!
    Whose glance causd sudden fire from Dakshans frame to spring,
    And goodly Kamans too! In sacred Perun-turrai Thou
    neath the Kurunthams flowry shade didst rest.
    Great Anganan! when I Thy servant craving call,
    BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANTS FEARS BEGONE! (12)

    IV.

    The Lotus-god, the four-facd, Kannan too,
    dark as the azure sky, could not approach
    Thee, Pure One! when They prayd Thee to shine forth,
    Father! thou wert as mighty flame displayd.
    In Veda-echoing Perun-turrai Thou
    neath the Kurunthams flowry shade didst rest.
    Great Being spotless! when Thy servant craving calls,
    BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANTS FEARS BEGONE! (16)

    V.

    [These two lines are not translateable!]
    ...........................................
    .....................................
    ............................................
    ....................................
    Thou, Who in Perun-turrais sylvan groves
    neath the Kurunthams flowry shade didst rest.
    O Teacher glorious! when Thy servant craving calls,
    BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANTS FEARS BEGONE! (20)

    VI.

    O Happy One and Pure! Thou like to gem
    whose radiant beams mid pure white ashes shine!
    In mind of those who think of Thee Thou givst
    sweetness intense. Thou rare Ambrosia, Who
    In sacred Perun-turrais home of Vedic lore
    neath the Kurunthanms flowry shade didst rest.
    O Father glorious! when Thy servant craving calls,
    BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANTS FEARS BEGONE! (24)

    VII.

    Thou True One changing oft Thy form; Meru Thy bow,
    Thy foemens cities three Thy HAND consumed!
    Thy FOOT burnt up deaths king! O ruddy One,
    Whose FORM was as a fiery column seen!
    Thou, Who in Perun-turrais happy home
    neath the Kurunthams flowry shade didst rest.
    O glorious Teacher! when Thy servant craving calls,
    BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANTS FEARS BEGONE! (28)

    VIII.

    The Free, the First, the Triple-eyed, the Sage,-
    Thou givst the heavenly goal to those,
    Who offring flowers with clustering buds adore,
    devoutly pondering praise; consummate One,
    Thou, Who in Perun-turrais happy home
    neath the Kurunthams flowry shade didst rest.
    O Sire, all glorious! when Thy servant craving calls,
    BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANTS FEARS BEGONE! (32)

    IX.

    Regarding me distraught, Thou badst confusion cease,
    destroying thought of this world and the next,
    Thou very God, Thou Holy One, upon Thy crest
    the swelling lustrous snake and Ganga bide.
    Thou, Who in Perun-turrais home of lucid Vedic lore
    neath the Kurunthams flowry shade didst rest.
    Glorious in mercy! when Thy servant craving calls,
    BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANTS FEARS BEGONE! (36)
    X.

    In Perun-turrai girt with ordered stately groves,
    neath the Kurunthams flowry shade,
    I call to mind Thy glories all, and pondering yearn,
    and as my mighty Lord Thee oft invoke
    Ascetic rare! when I, Thy servant, craving call,
    struggling amid the billowy sea,
    In grace declare the fitting path to reach
    the silver hill, and BID ME COME! (40)

    Hymn XXX- tiru kazhukundra pathicam

    THE LYRIC OF THE EAGLE-MOUNT.

    THE SIGHT OF THE GURU.

    -----
    This is one of the places which the Sage is said to have visited before seeing Cithambaram.
    It would appear that here he had some peculiar manifestation of the god, who had revealed
    himself to him in Perun-turrai. It is open to conjecture that the Guru, whom he regarded as
    Civan manifested in the flesh, resided there, or at least was a constant visitant. The place
    itself is a renowned Caiva shrine, and has its own legend, a considerable poem of 832 quatrains.
    This is of recent origin, and, I should suppose, of small authority. It states that the original name
    of the hill was Veda-giri, or the hill of the Veda. It is said to have four hills clustered together, each
    being one of the four Vedas, while the central peak, which is of basaltic formation, is Civan Himself
    in the form of the Lingam. It is curiously stated that in Arur the god dwells for the first watch of the night,
    and in Cithambaram for the midnight watch; but in Veda-giri he is always to be formed. The name of the
    hill of the Veda was changed to that of the hill of the Eagle, because two eminent persons, having
    disputed an order of Civan, were sentenced to perform penance there.
    -----
    I.

    O peaceful Perun-turrais mighty Lord!
    to those whose talk is of Thy thousand names
    One even stream of matchless pleasure flows.
    My Lord, Who once didst wipe away sore griefs,
    When good and evil deeds were balanced,-
    (for aftermath of ill no living seed),-
    In sacred glories countless didst Thou come,
    AND SHOW THYSELF UPON THE EAGLES HILL (4)

    II.

    Thou Who for hire of cakes didst carry earth!
    Thou madman great, of the great havensshrine!
    While I, who knew no law of right, to Thee,
    through ignorant delusion drew not near,
    O Best of Beings, Lord of Civa-world,
    me, lower than the meanest cur, a man
    Of evils sore, Thou camst to make Thine own,
    AND SHOWDST THYSELF UPON THE EAGLES HILL (8)

    III.

    In wilderment I strayed from Perun-turrai far,
    where tears were changed to joy, and foulness purged;
    By sinful deeds to ruin brought, henceforth
    I sinner knew not what should after grow.
    Reft of the home where Thy bright feet once stood,
    a prey to dire perplexity, I dwelt.
    To save me from confusion sore Thou camst
    AND SHOWDST THYSELF UPON THE EAGLES HILL (12)

    IV.

    That I the matchless ornament might wear
    of love unique,- draw nigh, and daily praise,-
    Abashed with awe of reverence,- the shame
    that knows no shame,- sinking amid the sea;
    Of Perun-turrai, dear beyond compare,
    the glorious ship I seized and climbed theren;
    Straightway, in splendour no eye sees, Thou camst
    AND SHOWDST THYSELF UPON THE EAGLES HILL (16)

    V.

    In glorious form displayed, Thou teeming cloud
    of perfect good, in Perun-turrai seen!
    O matchless Gem, Who puttst Thyself within
    the thought of me, who naught of virtue knew!
    The world itself shall witness bear that I
    desired Thee eagerly, and then Thou camst,-
    That when I called Thee, then Thou camst,-
    AND SHOWDST THYSELF UPON THE EAGLES HILL (20)

    VI.

    Great flood of Perun-turrais shrine, Thou didst
    the love that knows no change bestow;
    When foes with many an impious speech stood round,
    what didst Thou unto me before them all?
    Thy Foot shall be my only refuge still,
    from every death, and every various ill,-
    And, therefore, when in love I called, Thou camst,
    AND SHOWDST THYSELF UPON THE EAGLES HILL (24)

    VII.

    O Ican, Who the four and sixty demons madst
    to share the eightfold qualities divine,-
    When I had sunk in evil deeds,- the fruit
    of triple foulness that confusion brings,-
    Thou didst the bands of clinging sorrow loose;
    madst me Thine own; gavst me Thy feets pure flower;
    In presence of Thy servant-band didst come
    AND SHOW THYSELF UPON THE EAGLES HILL (28)

    Hymn XXXI- ganda pathu

    MINE EYES HAVE SEEN.

    THE SIGHT OF THE MYSTIC DANCE
    or
    THE UNSPEAKABLE VISION.

    -----
    Tillai.- In the legends of the Sage it appears that he did not visit Tillai till he had seen the other
    shrines of Caiva worship, and had become renowned both as a devotee and as a poet. It almost
    appears as if there existed some rivalry between the great temple of the Pandiyan land in Madura,
    and the famous shrine of he Cora land in Cithambaram. It is quite certain that this latter in great
    measure superseded the former. It does not appear, indeed, that Manikka-Vacagar ever revisited
    Madura after his formal renunciation of his position there. It may almost be inferred that he was
    never heartily forgiven by the king for the misappropriation of the cost of the horses. Of the fifty-one
    poems about a half were composed in Tillai, and these may be divided into two classes: the lyrics
    that express his own feelings and illustrate his life; and those which were composed (as is believed)
    for the use of others. I wish that it had been possible to re-arrange the poems.

    Among the Tillai lyrics are to be found his most impassioned utterances. With this poem (XXXI)
    must be compared (XL), both of them expressing his enthusiastic joy at being permitted at length
    to behold the greatest shrine of his Master.

    Tillai in the time of the Sage was to the devotees of Civan what Jerusalem was to the Jews of old;
    and many of the expressions in these two lyrics will remind the reader of Psalm cxxii; and not a few of
    the expressions are identical with those in the rhyme often attributed to Bernard of Morlaix. One is
    frequently reminded of Jerusalem the Golden, with milk and honey blest.
    -----
    I.

    In senses power, sure cause of death, I erewhile wildered lay,-
    Oft wrapt through realms of boundless space, then plunged in dismal hells!
    He gave perception clear, made me all bliss,- made me His own!
    IVE TILLAI SEEN that holds the Gem, which endless rapture yields! (4)

    II.

    Enmeshed in grievous memories of deeds and fated births
    Outworn I lay; nor knew my soul one faintest thought of Him,
    The Matchless One, Who cuts off birth; Who made me His with power!
    HIM HAVE I SEEN IN TILLAIS COURT, where worships all the world! (8)

    III.

    His form I knew not,- even then He fixed His love on me,
    Planted Himself within my thought and flesh,- so made me His!
    The Lord of sacred Turutti, I, currish slave, with joy
    HAVE SEEN IN TILLAIS FANE ADORNED, the sweet and blissful seat! (12)

    IV.

    To me, untaught, most ignorant, the very lowest cur,
    In mighty grace He came, with heavenly beauty me to clothe,
    And loosed my servile bonds of sense in sight of many men;
    His form IVE SEEN IN TILLAIS TEMPLE COURT, where all bow down! (16)

    V.

    Me whirled about mid caste and clan and birth, and sore perplexed,-
    Vile helpless dog,- He made His own, all sorrow rooting out;
    Destroyed all folly,- alien forms,- all thought of I and mine;
    Ambrosia pure, HIM HAVE I SEEN IN TILLAI, where the saints consort! (20)

    VI.

    From birth itself, from sickness, age to scape; earths ties to loose;
    I went,- I SAW the Only-First-One, Owner of the world,
    Who dwells, while Vedic sages, hosts of heavenly ones adore,
    IN TILLAI-CITYS SACRED COURT, girt round with leafy groves. (24)

    VII.

    My servile bonds of sense in grace He loosed,- me loveless mean,-
    Fast tied He to His sacred Feet by willing minds stout bonds,
    That never part; made me a fool in sight of men; and now
    IVE TILLAI SEEN, where sportings of the wondrous Mage are known. (28)

    VIII.

    Sunk here midst infinite conceits, all ignorance was I;
    I lay, poor empty soul, unwetting aught that might spring forth;
    Now Him who made me His, bestowing raptures infinite,
    IVE SEEN IN TILLAI, where the guileless heavenly ones bow down! (32)

    IX.

    To me, a dog, who knew not anything of seemly right,
    He gave His heavenly grace, took me and cut off actions guilt;
    He gave unfailing love: light high and higher shone; Him I
    IN TILLAIS COURT HAVE SEEN, where the four mystic scrolls are conned! (36)

    X.

    The elements, the senses five, He is; and substance too.
    All diverse forms He, mighty, wears: knows no diversity.
    The gleaming Light that rules, and ill destroys; the Emerald;
    HIM HAVE I SEEN IN TILLAI BRIGHT, where Vedas worship and extol! (40)

    Hymn XXXII- praththanai pathu

    THE SUPPLICATION.
    I. Alternations of feeling.

    Mingling with Thy true saints, that day in speechless joy I stood;
    Next day, with dawning daylight trouble came, and there abode.
    My soul grows old. Master! to seek the gleam of fadeless bliss
    Wandring I went. In grace to me, Thy slave, let loye abound! (4)

    II. Impatience.

    Some of Thy saints have gained through plenteous love Thy grace. Grown lod,
    All vain my griefs, - of this vile corpse I see no end.
    Remove from sinful me my deeds of sin; let mercys sea oerflow!
    O Master, to Thy slave give ceaseless soul-subduing grace! (8)

    III. Fortitude-strong in love-needed.

    Deep in the vast Ambrosial sea of grace Thy perfect saints
    Have sunk. Lo, Lord, I wearied bear this frame with darkness filled!
    Men see, and cry, A madman, one of wildered mind is here.
    Master, that I may fearless live, true live I NEEDS must gain! (12)

    IV. Craving for consummate bliss

    I NEED!; I NEED! Midst Thy true faithful ones, in grace desiring me,
    Thou madst me Thine, my griefs expelld, - Ambrosia! precious peerless Gem,
    Like gleam of quenchless lamp! And I, Thy servant too, shall I
    Reach Thee, and neer again know NEED? Thou all-abounding Love! (16)

    V. Shall I get free from Self?

    Thou Partner of the bright-eyed maid! To dwell among Thy saints,
    Desiring Thee in truth, shall it be givn to sinful me
    By Thine own grace, gaining the ancient sea of bliss superne,
    To rest, in soul and body freed from thought of I and mine? (20)

    VI. Longing desire of the Infinite Bliss

    Thy loving ones have gained cessation absolute; but here
    My spirit ever melts, outside I lie,- base dog, and mourn!
    O Master mine, I would attain true loves vast sea of bliss,
    That cahnge, surcease, oblivion, sevrance, thought, bound, death knows not! (24)

    VII. Cut short Thy work!

    Theyve seen the sea-like bliss, have seized it, and enjoy! Ist meet,
    That I, low dog, with added pains and pining sore should bide?
    Master, do Thou Thyself give grace, I pray! I faint! I fail!
    Cut short Thy work! O light! let darkness flee before Thy mercys beam! (28)

    VIII. Come quickly

    Enterd amongst Thine own, to whom true melting grace abounds,
    I stand with soul like tough bambasastem, and wear away.
    O Civan, grant the love Thy crowned servants bear to Thee!
    O swiftly come, and give to me Thy tender beauteous Foot! (32)

    IX. Was I not made Thine own?

    Thine own stood round, and all declard: No grace withheld, all grace
    Is given, - and I, Thy servant, shall I mourn as aliens wont?
    Thou King of Civa-world, by glorious grace didst change my thought,
    An make me Thine,- I pray Thee, Lord, place me in changeless bliss! (36)

    X. Is aught gained by delay?

    Thou Partner sole of the Gazelle! Sweet fruit to them that worship Thee!
    Teacher! If I am like an unbord gourd, doth thus Thy glory live?
    O King, when comes the time that Thou wilt grant in grace to me
    A soul that melts and swells in knowing Thee, Who camst in flesh? (40)

    XI. Must I langusih here?

    In concert joining shall Thy saints, there bending smile and joy?
    O Master, drooping, all forlorn, like withered tree, must I
    Stand sullen while they mingle, melt, souls swelling, lost in bliss
    In rhythmic dance? Grant bliss of sweet communion with Thy grace! (44)

    Hymn XXXIII- kulaitha pathu

    THE DECAD OF THE BRUISED HEART
    or
    SELF-DEDICATION.

    -----
    It would be hard to find a more touching expression of absolute mystic self-renunciation
    than these verses contain.
    -----
    I. Useless suffering

    If cruel pain oppress from deeds of old, guard Thou
    Who ownest me! If I, a man of cruel deeds
    Suffer, from this my woe doth any gain accrue?
    O light of Umais eyes, take Thou me for Thine own!
    And though I err, ah! shouldst not Thou forgive,-
    Thou on whose crest the crescent rests? If I appeal,
    Wilt Thou withhold Thy grace, Father, from me Thy slave? (4)

    II. Why is the affliction of embodied existence prolonged?

    Thy slaves afflictions all to drive far off I deemd
    Thou madst me Thine, erewhile; Thou Partner of the Queen,
    Whose form is like the slender creeping plant! Our King;
    bidding me come, why didst Thou not in grace destroy
    This body vile? Our Lord, Who dwellst in you yon blest world!
    Thou calledst,- if my service not accepting now
    Thou dost afflict, Master, will any gain accrue? (8)

    III. Pardon my offences.

    Thy mercy given to save one void of worth,
    a dog like me, hath it this day passd all away?
    Thou Partner of the Tender One, our Mighty King,
    evn faults that like a mountain rise, to virtues turn,
    If Thou but say the word! If Thou didst take me once
    for Thine, why dost Thou not- though ruined- pity take
    On me? our Lord,- Thou of eight arms and triple eye! (12)

    IV. When wilt Thou call me back to Thee?

    Bridegroom of Her with fawnlike eyes! Our King! If Thou
    hast caused me Thine abiding glory to forget;
    If Thou hast thrust me out in fleshly form to dwell;
    if Thou hast caused Thy slave to wander here forlorn;
    Knowing Thy servants ignorance, O gracious King,
    when comes the day that Thou Thyself wilt show Thy grace?
    Ah! When, I cry, when wilt Thou call me back to Thee? (16)

    V. All is Thyself!

    The tongue itself that cries to Thee,- all other powers
    of my whole being that cry out,- all are THYSELF!
    Thou art my way of strength! The trembling thrill that runs
    through me is Thee! THYSELF the whole of ill and weal!
    None other here! Would one unfold and truly utter Thee,
    what way to apprehend? Thou Lord of Civa-world!
    And if trembling fear, shouldst Thou not comfort me? (20)

    VI. Desires.

    Thou knowst what to DESIRE is meet,- when we DESIRE
    Thourt He that wholly grants! To Ayan and to Mal
    DESIRING Thee, how hard to reach! Yet me Thou didst
    DESIRE, my service claim! DESIRING what didst Thou
    Bestow Thy grace? That and naught else do I DESIRE!
    And if aught else there be that stirs in me DESIRE!
    That too, in sooth, is Thy DESIRE,- is it not so? (24)

    VII. I am wholly Thine

    That very day my soul, my body, all to me
    pertaining, didst Thou not take as Thine own,
    Thou like a mountain strong! when me Thou madst Thy slave?
    And this day is there any hindrance found in me?
    Our mighty One! Eight-armd and Triple-eyed!
    Do Thou to me whats good alone, or do Thou ill,
    To all resigned, Im Thine and wholly Thine! (28)

    VIII. My destinies are in Thy hand.

    Me dog, and lower than a dog, all lovingly
    Thyself didst take for Thine. This birth-illusions thrall
    Is placd within Thy charge alone. And I in sooth,
    is there aught I need beyond that, with care search out?
    Herein is there authority at all with me?
    Thou mayst again consign me to some mortal frame;
    Orneath Thy jewelled foot mayst place me, Brow-eyed One! (32)

    IX. My soul is fixed on Thee.

    Thou in Whose brow a central eye doth gleam! Thy feet-
    the twain- I saw; mine eyes rejoicd; now, night and day,
    Without a thought, on them alone I ponder still!
    How I may quit this earthly frame, how I may come
    To enter neath Thy feet in bliss, I ponder not!
    Save Thee, O King, should I Thy servant ponder aught?
    Thy service here hath fulness of delight for me! (36)

    X. The hope deferred.

    Thy beauty only I, a slavish dog, desire,
    and cry aloud. O Master! Thou didst show to me
    Thy sacred Form in lustre shrind, and didst accept
    my service. Thou my Glory!- Mine august abode,
    In ancient days assurd, Thou now withholdst;- and so,
    O beauteous Lord!- Thou of the glorious mystic Word!
    My King,- sorely indeed hast Thou bruisd my poor heart! (40)

    Hymn XXXIV- uyir unnip pathu

    MY SOUL IS CONSUMED.

    RAPTURE OF LIFE IN CIVAN
    I. His praises.

    Partner of Umais loveliness! Destroyer of the deeds
    That to this frame cling fast! Thou Guardian of the Bull! Who dwellst
    In Perun-turrais sacred shrine by well-skilled bards extolled!
    When shall I joy, O when exulting sing, henceforth, I too? (4)

    II. His condescending love.

    And who am I would reach His foot? To me, mere cur, a throne
    He gave; enterd my flesh; mixed with my life; leaves not my soul.
    With crown of honey-dripping-locks, blest Perun-turrais Lord
    On me a gracious boon bestowd, that heavenly ones know not! (8)

    III. Sacred enthusiasm.

    I know myself no more; nor days nor nights recurrence; He
    Who mind and speech transcends with mystic madness maddend me;
    He owns the angry mighty Bull;- blest Perun-turrais Lord;
    The Brahman used to me wiles I know not,- O Beam divine! (12)

    IV. None like to Him.

    And are there other sin-destroyers, say! in this wide world?
    Entring me too, He made me His, melting my very bones!
    He bound me fast, O joy! Lord, Who in Perun-turrai dwells,
    He fills my mind, in eye enshrind, midmost in every word! (16)

    V. Cling to Him with reverent love.

    Ye who are freed from clinging ties, cling ye where man should cling!
    If ye desire the blissful goal to reach, swift hasten on!
    Learn ye the glory of the King, Who crowned with braided lock
    In Perun-turrai dwells; join ye with those who cherish there His foot! (20)

    VI. I am His, body and soul.

    Foulness that heaves like billows of the sea He all destroyd;
    My soul and body enerd,- tills, and quits no more. He Who
    In Perun-turrai dwells, with crown of spreading braided locks,
    Wreathd with the moons bright beams, our Lord Supreme. This is His wile! (24)

    VII. The goal reached.

    Glory I ask not; nor desire I wealth; not earth or heaven I crave;
    I seek no birth or death; those that desire not Civan nevermore
    I touch. Ive reachd the foot of sacred Perun-turrais King,
    And crownd myself! I go not forth! I know no going hence again! (28)

    VIII. Honey or nectar?

    Shall I name Thee honey from the branch? nectar from the sounding sea?
    Our Aran! precious Balm! my King! No powers have I to sing Thy praise,
    Who dwellst in Perun-turrais shrine, by loamy rice-fields girt,
    Thou Spotless One, Whose sacred Form the holy ash adorns! (32)

    IX. Withdrawal of comfort.

    Thee I know I need: and all I need I yet know not;
    Ah me! our Aran, precious Balm, Ambrosia, Thou Whose FOrm is like
    The crimson flower, Who dwellst in sacred Perun-turrais shrine,
    And still remainst, the very self within my soul! (36)

    X. Prayer permitted still.

    While dwellers in the heavenly world do holy deeds, in vain
    Bearing a frame of flesh compact, I stand like forest tree:
    Thou dwellst in Perun-turrais shrine, where honey-dripping cassiablooms;
    Though Im a sinner, yet I may implore, give grace to me! (40)

    Hymn XXXV- achchap pathu

    THE DECAD OF DREAD
    or
    ABSORPTION IN DIVINE KNOWLEDGE.
    I. Heretics.

    Not the sleek snake in anthill coild I dread;
    nor feigned truth of men of lies,-
    As I, in sooth, feel fear at night of those
    who have not learnt the Lofty-One
    To know; who near the Foot of the Brow-Eyd,-
    our Lord, crownd with the braided-lock,-
    Yet think theres other God. When these unlearnd we see,-
    AH ME! WE FEEL NO DREAD LIKE THIS! (4)

    II. False teachers.

    I shudder not, though evil yearnings rise;
    nor fear, though sea of deedsoerwhelm!
    Beside His sacred Form, our Lord of lords,-
    in which the Twono change discerned,
    When name of other gods,- whater they be,-
    by lips profane is but pronouncd:
    If I see those, who loathe not such discourse,-
    AH ME! WE FEEL NO DREAD LIKE THIS! (8)

    III. The unloving.

    I dread not mighty javlin, dripping gore;
    nor glance of maids with jewelld arms!
    But those that will not sweetly taste His grace,-
    Whose glance can melt the inmost soul,-
    Who dances in the hallowd court,- my Gem
    unstaind and pure,- nor praise His Name:-
    Such men of loveless hearts when we behold,-
    AH ME! WE FEEL NO DREAD LIKE THIS! (12)

    IV. The unfeeling.

    I dread not chatter vain of parrot-tongues;
    nor fear their guileful wanton smile!
    If, drawing nigh the Vethians feet, Whose Form
    the sacred ashes white displays,
    Mens souls nor melt, nor weep they worshipping,
    their eyes with gushing teardrops filld:
    If these, of tender feeling void, we see,-
    AH ME! WE FEEL NO DREAD LIKE THIS! (16)

    V. The undevout.

    I fear not, though diseases all should come;
    nor dread I birth with death conjoind!
    The crescent moon as ornament He wears,
    yet men praise not His roseate Feet,
    (Which Mal, though the firm ground He clave, saw not,)
    nor join His worshippers devout!
    If those that wear not ashes white we see,-
    AH ME! WE FEEL NO DREAD LIKE THIS! (20)

    VI. Not real worshippers.

    I dread not angry flash of gleaming fires;
    nor fear, though mountains on me roll !
    His shoulders ashes wear, Lord of the Bull,
    Sire, passing utterance of speech,-
    Yet men praise not His lotus Feet, nor bow,
    nor crown them with the full-blown flower!
    If those hard hearts, that yield not to His power we see,-
    AH ME! WE FEEL NO DREAD LIKE THIS! (24)

    VII. Devoid of enthusiasm.

    Not guilt unseemly that swift vengeance brings;
    nor stroke of instant death I dread!
    He dances in the beauteous court, and waves
    mid smoking clouds His fiery axe;
    The cassia-wreath, all bright with jewelld buds,
    He wears, of beings First! Yet men
    Praise not His Foot! If these, unmovd by grace we see,-
    AH ME! WE FEEL NO DREAD LIKE THIS! (28)

    VIII. No high aspirations.

    I fear not elephant to pillar chaind;
    nor tiger fiery-eyed I dread!
    The Sire, whose crest sweet fragrance sheds,- His Feet
    that heavnly ones may not approach,-
    Men praise not, nor with triumph haste
    within His shrine to sweetly live !
    If we behold these men of wisdom reft,-
    AH ME! WE FEEL NO DREAD LIKE THIS! (32)

    IX. False shame.

    I fear not thunderbolt from out the cloud;
    nor changing confidence of kings!
    Our Lord of lords the very poison made
    Ambrosia, by His gracious act;
    He makes us His in way of righteousness;
    yet men smear not the sacred ash!
    If those who from His side shrink thus we see,-
    AH ME! WE FEEL NO DREAD LIKE THIS! (36)

    X. Men that worship not.

    I dread not arrow that unswerving flies;
    nor wrath of deaths dread King, I fear !
    Him Whose adornment is the mighty moon
    men praise not, nor with hymns adore;
    They ponder not eith souls subdued, while tears
    from brighty beaming eyes pour forth.
    These thankless men,- not men !- if we behold,-
    AH ME! WE FEEL NO DREAD LIKE THIS! (40)

    Hymn XXXVI- tiru pandi pathikam

    THE SACRED PANDI

    [THE GROWTH OF RAPTURE]

    -----
    The Lyric of the Sacred Pandi.- Note IV should be studied as introductory to this very dramatic
    poem, which is in every way a remarkable composition; yet I should hardly venture to affirm that
    Manikka-Vacagar was its author. In order to understand it, it is necessary to call to mind the strange
    legend of Civans appearance at Madura as a horseman, or as He is here called a warrior.
    The first stanza is supposed to be uttered by the poet as he contemplates the God entering
    Madura on that occasion, surrounded by the other gods, all on splendid chargers. Civan Himself is
    mounted upon leader of a band of foreign merchants, the graces of the accomplished knight, and
    the majesty of a king. He has come, according to His promise, to save His servant from suffering,
    and to vindicate His fidelity. The poet in his soul adores his Deliverer and his God.

    In the remaining stanzas he addresses the assembled multitude, and expounds the mystery.
    Fear not as though it were the Avatar of some ruthless conqueror! This horseman is Civan,-
    the founder, according to legend, of the dynasty of Pandiyan kings. He is the abiding King of
    Madura, and now He comes in grace to the mortal king of Madura, Arimarttanan. The whole
    typifies the sacred war that He wages as the Pathi against the enemies and tormentors of His
    peoples souls. The third stanza skilfully, though by an anachronism, allegorizes the flood that
    Civan brought upon the city, when at His command the Vaigai overflowed its banks. In the fifth
    stanza he spiritualizes the idea that Civan appears here as a merchant, a seller of horses. The
    sixth, referring to His previous appearance at Perun-turrai, hints at His character as a Guru, a
    giver of spiritual light; and the whole ends with an urgent call to the people to throw aside all
    foolish delusions, and to march boldly forward under His banner, and accept Him as their King.
    The way in which the whole legend is allegorized points, it may be thought, to a later period,
    when the Caiva Siddhanta system had been more developed; and when, under the influence of
    the Santana Teachers, the whole system was being harmonized. There is here a disposition to
    make little of the myth, and to bring into prominence its spiritual teaching. This was the second
    stage of the Caiva development. This however is mere conjecture, and there seems to be scarcely
    any means for its absloute verification.

    The metre is to my ear the most rhythmical of all the species of Tamil poetry. The student should
    learn to recite and enjoy the verses, if he would fully understand them!
    -----
    I. The God appears, and is recognised by the Sage.

    The Bridegroom of the mountain Maid,- the Pandiyans Ambrosia rare,-
    The One,- Who is from all diverse,- I worship at His flowry Feet!
    Made manifest in grace, He on a charger rides, and thrills my soul
    In Warrior-guise ! no other form beside my inmost soul doth know ! (4)

    II. Behold His condescension.

    They gatherd round, bewilderd all, as in a waking dream;- I spoke:
    Like sun that veils its beams He comes, His hand divine holds warriors spear.
    He on a charger rides ! Ye see our race with ruin threatened sore !
    Tis thus for Maduras king he stays the flowing tide of future birth ! (8)

    III. The Flood in Madura.

    Ye who a soul possess that swims and bathes in raptures rushing tide !
    A Pandi-king, He mounts His steed, to make all earth the gladness share.
    He takes the form of flood of joy unique, and holds His servants hearts.
    Plunging in flood of heavenly bliss, O cherish ye His sacred Foot! (12)

    IV. The Holy War.

    Good friends, persist not in this round of BIRTH ! This is the time ! The King
    Of the good southern land shines forth, and ever draws from out its sheath
    His gleaming sword of wisdom pure, His steed of rapture urges on,
    Makes war with warring BIRTH through the wide world, and foes confounded flee ! (16)

    V. How are His good gifts to be gained: a merchant.

    While there is time, give Him your love, and save yourselves ! Hate ye to Him
    Who ate the poison, Whom tis hard for him who ate the earth,
    And him of faces four, and all the heavenly ones, to draw anigh;
    Who to His servants stores of grace dispenses, our good Pandi-lord ! (20)

    VI. This is His day of grace: a teacher.

    That gathering darkness may disperse, illusions cease, and all be clear,
    The Splendour urges on His steed. The Minavan himself knows not
    To utter all His praise. Would ye all joy obtain, seek His blest Foot !
    This is the gift in rarest grace the Pandiyan gives, - RELEASE for aye ! (24)

    VII. He gives audience: a conquering king.

    When on illusions charger He in beauty rides, and gathers round
    His waiting hosts; the enmities whose name is earthly birth shall cease
    To those who refuge find He gives grace, glorious, vast, inscrutable.
    Draw near the South-kings mighty Foot, Whose conquering banner proudly waves! (28)

    VIII. Receive His gracious gift.

    In deathless raptures flood our souls He plunges, shows His changeless grace;
    Drives far away our DEEDS, dissolves the bonds of old impurity;
    And makes us His! Come draw ye near the Pandi-rulers mighty Foot.
    Press forward, take the gracious boon of Him Who made the circling world ! (32)

    IX. The magic power of His appearing.

    That men may cross the mingling sea of evil DEEDS and future BIRTH,
    The Pandi-king supreme, Who melts the soul of those that love and praise,
    Upon His charger came. When this the slender flower-like maidens knew,
    Like trees they stood,- their senses rapt, themselves forgot, and all beside ! (36)

    X. In faith and love cling to Him.

    As once He conquered death, so now the five sense-kings He conquered too;
    And then, in beauteous state, Himself,- and the great Goddess with Him,- sat !
    Strong Warrior, on the Bull he came to Minavan, and slew his foes !
    O ye of weak and wavering faith ! Draw near, hold fast His roseate Feet ! (40)

    Hymn XXXVII- piditha pathu

    THE DECAD OF THE TENACIOUS GRASP.

    -----
    This is one of the most characteristic of the Sages lyrics, and would seem to belong to
    a later period than that when the cry of the forsaken (VI) was composed. It is in singular
    contrast to that lyric. He had meanwhile visited many shrines, and had passed through much
    struggle; but when he reached what is here called Tiru-toni-puram(the sacred Boat-town), of
    which the modern name is Shialli, he found a magnificient temple there,that seemed to him
    like a reproduction on earth of the silver mountain Kailasam, on which the God dwells in splendour
    with Parvathi. This shrine has always been remarkable, but is especially honoured now as the
    reputed birthplace of Tiru-nana-sambandhar; who, in popular estimation, is perhaps the greatest
    of the Caiva saints. In his legend we have elsewhere given some notices of this his home. It has
    twelve names connected with wild legends; but is called here the sacred Boat-town, because when
    at the end of each aeon the deluge of universal destruction overwhelms the universe, this shrine floats
    securely on the waters,- the everlasting ark ! Here it seems that the Sage renewed his vows to his guru,
    from whom he had somewhat departed in thought and practice. He seems to regard himself now as a
    sivanmuthan and declares that he will henceforth hold fast his allegiance under all circumstances,
    in life and through death.
    ----
    I. Thou art our own !

    O King of those above ! - O ceaseless Plenitude
    of mystic bliss ! - To me defiled Thou camst
    Fruit newly ripe, and madst me Thine own dwelling-place.
    Balm, yielding bliss all earthly bliss beyond !
    True meanings Certitude ! The Foot in glory bright !
    My Wealth of bliss ! O Civa-Peruman !
    OUR VERY OWN - IVE SEIZED THEE,- HOLD THEE FAST ! HENCEFORTH,
    AH, WHITHER GRACE IMPARTING WOULDST THOU RISE? (4)

    II. My only Help in this life.

    Ever the bull Thou holdest,- King of heavens glad host !
    To me a man of sin Possession true !
    Thy slave is foul decay that quits not, merest earth;
    within a very nest of worms I lie !
    Thou madst me Thine, and safe hast kept, lest I should fail
    at last; O God, O mighty Sea of grace!
    FOR EVERMORE - IVE SEIZED THEE,- HOLD THEE FAST ! HENCEFORTH,
    AH, WHITHER GRACE IMPARTING WOULDST THOU RISE? (8)

    III. Reality amidst illusions.

    O Mother! O my Sire ! My Gem beyond compare !
    Ambrosia, ever-precious yield of love !
    I, vile one, dwell in short-lived house of worms,
    where false illusions ever growing press.
    On me Thou hast bestowd the true and perfect rest;
    my Wealth of bliss ! O Civa-Peruman !
    UPON THIS EARTH- IVE SEIZED THEE,- HOLD THEE FAST ! HENCEFORTH,
    AH, WHITHER GRACE IMPARTING WOULDST THOU RISE? (12)

    IV. Light in the darkness.

    Splendour of grace ! Well ripend luscious Fruit unique !
    King of ascetics stern of all prevailing power !
    Science of meanings deep ! Delight transcending praise !
    Of mystic sacred musings Fulness blest !
    Thou enterest Thy servants thought, and all is clear !
    My Wealth of bliss ! O Civa-Peruman !
    IN EACH DARK HOUR- IVE SEIZED THEE,- HOLD THEE FAST ! HENCEFORTH,
    AH, WHITHER GRACE IMPARTING WOULDST THOU RISE? (16)

    V. The One Helper in lifes struggles.

    Thou only One, to Whom can none compare ! Thou Light
    shining within the very soul of me, Thy slave !
    On me who knew not the true goal,- of merit void,
    O Love unique,- Thou hast choice grace bestowed !
    O radiant Form Whose splendour bright no tongue can tell !
    My Wealth of bliss ! O Civa-Peruman !
    IN WEARINESS - IVE SEIZED THEE,- HOLD THEE FAST ! HENCEFORTH,
    AH, WHITHER GRACE IMPARTING WOULDST THOU RISE? (20)

    VI. In death, as in life.

    O Pinnagan, our great Possession, Thou hast held
    as sacred shrine my empty worthless mind;
    Hast given me rapturous joy that knows no bound; hast cut
    the root of birth, and made me all Thine own !
    O mystic Form, by me in open vision seen !
    My Wealth of bliss ! O Civa-Peruman !
    IN HOUR OF DEATH - IVE SEIZED THEE,- HOLD THEE FAST ! HENCEFORTH,
    AH, WHITHER GRACE IMPARTING WOULDST THOU RISE? (24)

    VII. The revelation of the way to worship.

    Thou Who didst teach the way to grasp that Ancient One,
    Who cuts the root of every servile bond !
    O Being,- Who didst show to me Thy flowery feet;
    my worship didst accept; entring my soul;-
    Resplendent Lamp ! Thou mystic Form of splendour bright !
    My Wealth of bliss ! O Civa-Peruman !
    RULER SUPREME - IVE SEIZED THEE,- HOLD THEE FAST ! HENCEFORTH,
    AH, WHITHER GRACE IMPARTING WOULDST THOU RISE? (28)

    VIII. The Deity everywhere present .

    O Father ! worlds on worlds Thy presence fills !
    Thou Primal Deity ! O wondrous One
    Who knows no end ! Thy saints devoutly cling to Thee !
    My Wealth of bliss ! O Civa-Peruman !
    Wild Vagrant, living Germ in beings every form,-
    diverse Thyself from every living thing !
    ILLUSIONIST - IVE SEIZED THEE,- HOLD THEE FAST ! HENCEFORTH,
    AH, WHITHER GRACE IMPARTING WOULDST THOU RISE? (32)

    IX. The rapture of devotion.

    The mothers thoughtful care her infant feeds: Thou deignst
    with greater love to visit sinful me, -
    Melting my flesh, flooding my soul with inward light,
    unfailing raptures honied sweetness Thou
    Bestowest,- through my every part infusing joy !
    My Wealth of bliss ! - O Civa-Peruman !
    CLOSE FOLLOWING THEE - IVE SEIZED THEE,- HOLD THEE FAST ! HENCEFORTH,
    AH, WHITHER GRACE IMPARTING WOULDST THOU RISE? (36)

    X. The delight of His indwelling.

    O Ruler, spotless Gem, Who madst me Thine, thrilling
    my frame through every pore; in friendly shape
    Didst enter it,- as twere a vast and golden shrine,-
    making this body vile of sweetness full !
    Affliction, birth and death, bewilderment,- all links
    of life,- Thou hast cut off, O beauteous Gleam !
    MY SOULS DELIGHT - IVE SEIZED THEE,- HOLD THEE FAST ! HENCEFORTH,
    AH, WHITHER GRACE IMPARTING WOULDST THOU RISE? (40)

    Hymn XXXVIII- tiruvesaravu

    SACRED SADNESS.

    [ABSTRACTION FROM OBJECTIVE THOUGHT.]
    I.

    My iron mind full oftern didst Thou draw, and melt my frame;
    Thy feet to me didst show, as though the sweet canes pleasantness;
    Thou of the braided lock, where waters wander wave on wave!
    The jackals all Thou madst great horses; thus didst show Thy grace. (4)

    II.

    Thou Partner of the maid whose words are music! To thine own
    Ambrosia precious, sating every soul ! Master, Thy slave
    Rule Thou ! Cut off these earthly births. When Thou didst pity me
    I saw Thy foot in vision clear, and, ah, my soul was freed ! (8)

    III.

    No hiding place had I; in hell of births and deaths I sank;
    No loving hand was stretched to aid; Master, Thou badst me come,
    Who didst the poison eat from out the swelling sea ! To me,
    How Thou didst show Thy flowery foot, our Deity supreme ! (12)

    IV.

    Dancer with serpent-girded foot ! Thou of the braided lock !
    Lord of the saints crowned with Thy flowery foot ! me dost Thou save,
    From praising meaner gods that others praise. O wondorous grace !
    I ponder how Thou to my soul didst show Thy saving power. (16)

    V.

    No lore of wisdom had I, melted not in rapturous tears;-
    Yet other gods knew not ! ANd by Thy word, our mighty Lord !
    My soul exulted when I gained Thy foot. To me, Thy slave,
    As though one gave to cur a golden seat, Thy grace was shown. (20)

    VI.

    Sore troubled by the glancing eyes of damsels, soft of foot,
    A poisonous anguish piercd my trembling frame; yet by
    Thy grace I scaped, my Lord, my Owner ! Me Thou badst Fear not,
    And madst Thine own,- Ambrosia of the sacred temple court ! (24)

    VII.

    For me Thou causedst birth to cease, great Lord of bliss, Who dwellst unknown
    By even the heavenly ones in Perun-turrais southern shrine !
    Entering in love, melting my heart within, Thou madest me Thine !
    Great Lord, such was the way that Thou didst look on me ! (28)

    VIII.

    O Ancient One ! First One, that grows not old ! The Endless
    Chaunted word ! True Essence ! Burgeoned forth as that WHICH IS,
    AND IS NOT. Entering here, me who in error rolled, Thy grace
    Restored, and made Thine own. Such was Thy way, O mighty One ! (32)

    IX. Special manifestation in Idai-maruthur.

    Sprang up Thy foot, as sweetly fragrant flower within my mind, melting my soul !
    In every street I wept, and praised Thee, mighty Lord of bliss !
    Mercy supreme that as wide ocean rolls, I tasted, plunged therein !
    Father, in Idai-maruthur Thou showdst Thy grace to me ! (36)

    X. No desert in me; all in His grace !

    Have I indeed performed ascetic deeds, Ci-va-ya-na-ma gained to chaunt !
    Civan, the mighty Lord, as honey and as rare ambrosia sweet,
    Himself He came, entered my soul,- to me His slave gave grace;
    So that I hated, loathed this life of soul in flesh enmeshed, that day. (40)

    Hymn XXXIX- tirup pulambal

    THE SACRED LAMENT.

    [THE MATURIY OF RAPTURE.]
    I. I praise none but Thee.

    O Thou Whose way Ayan, from flowry lotus sprung, knows not, nor Mal !
    Partner of her whose swelling bosom wears the Gongu flower ! Whose form
    White ash displays ! Owner of blest Arur, begrit with lofty wall !
    Saving Thy flower-like feet, nought else will I Thy servant ever praise ! (4)

    II. To Thee alone I look for help.

    Thou of the braided tuft ! Fire-wielder ! Thou Whose weapon is the dart
    Three-leavd and gleaming ! Light superne ! Lord of the flock ! The soft, white bull
    Is thine ! O Lord of Perun-turrai girt by spreading groves ! Thy slave
    Am I. Owner, I know in truth no other present help than Thee. (8)

    III.

    Nor friends, nor kin I seek; no city I desire; no name I crave;
    No learned ones I seek; and henceforth lessons to be conned suffice.
    Thou dancer, in Kuttalam dwelling blissful, Thy resounding feet
    Ill sek, that as the cow yearns for its calf, my longing soul may melt. (12)

    Hymn XL.- kulaap pathu

    THE DECAD OF GLORIOUS TILLAI.

    [UNINTERMITTED ENJOYMENT]
    I. He enters on a life of absolute renunciation.

    The potsherd and the skull I deemed my kin; my soul dissolved;
    Wealth to be sought was Civans foot alone, I clearly saw;
    With soul and body to the earth in worship bent, a slave,
    IVE REACHD HIM WHERE HE DANCES, LORD OF TILLAIS HOME OF JOY! (4)

    II. Here shall I be set free.

    Through fond desire of those of slender form and gentle words,
    How many deeds soever guilt increasing, I have done,
    Nor death nor birth I dread ! He causd me to embrace His feet;
    A slave, IVE REACHED HIM WHO BEARS RULE IN TILLAIS HOME OF JOY ! (8)

    III. He brought back my wandering mind.

    Melting my inmost frame, He killed the germ of twofold deeds;-
    Pluckt out my rooted griefs;- made purely one the manifold;-
    So that all former things might perish quite, He entered in !
    IVE REACHED HIM WHO IN LOVE BEARS RULE IN TILLAIS HOME OF JOY ! (12)

    IV. Civan made known only to disciplined minds.

    Who severs not Himself from those whose minds are severed still
    From vain assembles void of sign,and way, and tempermeet,-
    The goal of bliss,- Ambrosias mighty flow,- to chastened thought
    Revealed,- IVE REACHED HIM WHO BEARS RULE IN TILLAIS HOME OF JOY ! (16)

    V. The consummation gained in Tillai

    This same embodiment bound up with name and quality
    To consummate, He cuts off sin that clings ! His servants all
    As they draw near, the honey taste of Civans mercy, and
    Are filled, where Ive REACHED HIM WHO RULES IN TILLAIS HOME OF JOY ! (20)

    VI. My being in His hand.

    Bud on the bough, then rounded flower, next fruit unripe, then fruit
    Matured,- my frame thus formed He made His own, nor hence departs;-
    That trusting thought may ever cling to Him, as it clings now,
    IVE REACHED HIM WHO BEARS RULE IN TILLAIS GOLDEN HOME OF JOY ! (24)

    VII. The mighty foot.

    The demons arm for strength renowned, by the same sacred foot
    That pressed upon my head, was crushed, and glorious rested there;
    Thus by His grace Im freed galling bonds of life, and here
    IVE REACHED HIM WHO BEARS RULE IN TILLAIS HOME OF THRILLING JOY ! (28)

    VIII.

    The sacred foot that walked within the wilds after the wild
    Black boar that digs deep down, He planted on my head;
    And so surpassing power of the five fierce ones mighty play
    Doth cease, when IVE REACHED HIM WHO RULES IN TILLAIS HOME OF JOY ! (32)

    IX.

    I lay as one who tills a barren field and reaps no crop;-
    Twas then the gain of penance done of old accrued; and thus
    Before the Caivans roseate lotus foot I bent my worthless head
    His own,- IVE REACHED HIM WHO BEARS RULE IN TILLAIS HOME OF JOY ! (36)

    X.

    Her form He shares who by His side grows as a tender bough;-
    To Him I with right mind my sacred ministries perform;-
    This here, abolishes whateer results this state can yield;
    IVE REACHED HIM WHO BEARS RULE IN TILLAIS HOME OF HEAVENLY JOY ! (40)

    Hymn XLI.- arputha pathu

    THE MIRACLE-DECAD

    [THE UNUTTERABLE EXPERIENCE]

    -----
    The following decad was composed at Tiru-perun-turrai, and is probably one of the first sung by
    our bard. It is in some respects quite unique among his compositions, and certainly has not the flowing
    case and rapture of some of his subsequent verses; but perhaps it reveals more of himself than any
    other. It was put forth, as would seem, immediately after his conversion; and is a thankful acknowledgment
    of the grace that has delivered him (as he now thinks) completely, and for ever, from the bonds of sensual
    passion.

    The three things which a Caiva saint has to get free from are sensual passion, wrath, and the infatuation
    that regards the phenomenal as the real. Our Sage seems never to have been troubled with wrathful tendencies;
    and, in fact, must have been a very gentle and sweet-tempered man; but it must be remembered that at the
    time of his conversion he was yet in his early youth, the Prime Minister and favourite of the great Pandiyan
    king, the virtual ruler of that ancient realm, boasting a pure and lofty lineage, of prepossessing appearance
    and manner, instinct with the glow of a poets enthusiasm; and, in fact, possessing all that the phenomenal
    world has to give. Remembering, too, the tone and manners of his time and people, it is not to be wondered
    at that this poem makes acknowledgement of a previous utter absorption in worldly enjoyments, and a habit
    of mental infatuation,- apparently absolute. From the first and third of the trio of evils, he had very little
    chance, humanly speaking, of ever becoming free. Yet the history tells us that he had previously sought
    for light, had consulted teachers of many systems, and had waited in darkness and in bonds for the coming
    of the Master Whose service should be perfect freedom from sensual thraldom. This poem is his thanks
    giving for (what he believes to be) his final deliverance. It will be noted that he dwells with persistent
    monotony on one theme: he is free; the time has not yet come for the analysis of his fellings; or for
    considering his future career. There is here an almost entire absence of mythology,- the one idea of God
    that he has before him is the loving Guru Whose feet have crowned the suppliants head; even Uma, the mother,
    is not mentioned or alluded to; he utters no invitation to others to join him in praise; his is a gladness with which
    no stranger can intermediate.

    The other poems, sung in the same place soon after, show him recovering from the overwhelming effect of
    his first glad surprise, and in them he finds it possible to dwell upon other topics.

    The Tiruvacagamis a veritable Pilgrims Progress, and surely reveals the experience of a devout and godly
    soul. It is possible that in this and in other of the poems, lines may have been altered and even verses added;
    for there is a noticeable discrepancy here and there; but internal evidence justifies us in concluding that mainly
    we have here the unrestrained utterances of a Caiva mystic of the eighth century.
    -----
    I. The Truth.

    By lust bewilderd;- in this earthly sphere
    caught in the circling sea of joyous life;-
    By whirling tide of womans charms engulfd;-
    lest I should sink with mind perturbd,
    He gave His sacred grace, that falseness all
    my soul might flee, and showed His golden feet !
    The TRUTH Himself,- He stood in presence there:
    THIS MATCHLESS MIRACLE I TELL NOT, I ! (4)

    II. The King.

    I gave no fitting gift with lavish hand
    of full-blown flowers; nor bowed with revrence meet.
    He grace conferrd, lest I should tread the paths
    of grief, with mind bewildered by soft dames
    With fragrant bosoms fair. He came to save,
    and showed to me His golden jewelld feet;
    As KING in presence manifest He stood:
    THIS MATCHLESS MIRACLE I TELL NOT, I ! (8)

    III. The Ineffable Essence.

    Busied in earth I acted many a lie;
    I spake of I and mine,- illusions old;
    Nor shunned what caused me pain; while sins increased
    I wandered raving. Me, that BEING RARE,-
    By the great mystic Vedas sought in vain,-
    held fast in presence there; to lowly me
    Essential sweetness was the food He gave:
    THIS MIRACLE OF GRACE I KNOW NOT, I ! (12)

    IV. The Helper.

    To birth and death that cling to man, I gave no thought;
    and uttering merest lies went on my way.
    By eyes of maids with flowing jet-black locks
    disturbed, with passion filled, I helpless lay.
    He came ! the anklets on His roseate feet,-
    I heard their tinkling sound; nor parts the bliss!
    In grace my precious HELPER made me His:
    THIS MIRACLE OF LOVE I KNOW NOT, I ! (16)

    V. Freedom.

    I wealth and kindered and all other bliss
    enjoyd; by tender maidens charms was stirrd;
    I wandered free in joyous intercourse;
    such goodly qualities it seemed were there.
    He set me free; to stay the coure of deeds
    my foes, He showed His foot-flowers tender grace,
    My spirit stirred, entered within, and made me His:
    THIS MATCHLESS MIRACLE I KNOW NOT, I ! (20)

    VI. The Sea of excellence.

    I gave no thought to birth and death, that yield
    their place successive; but with maidens joined
    I sank engulfed as by a mighty flood:
    their rosy lips my death ! I madly roamed.
    The SEA OF EXCELLENCE, Whom neither quality
    nor name of excellence defines,-
    He came, and tenderly embracing made me His:
    THIS MIRACLE OF GRACE I KNOW NOT, I ! (24)

    VII. The Father.

    Though born a man, unfailing gifts
    I laid not at the golden feet; nor did I cull
    The clusterd flowers, by rule and wont prescribd;
    nor chaunted the Five Letters due. Oercome
    By the full-bosomd damsels jet-black eyes
    I prostrate lay. SHowing His flowry feet,
    To me the FATHER came, and made me His :
    THIS MIRACLE OF GRACE I KNOW NOT, I ! (28)

    VIII. He Whom words express not.

    He caused the twofold deeds to cease, that cause
    this swing of soul with body joined. He, Whom
    Tis hard to learn by uttered sound to know,
    gave me to know Himself: thus made me light !
    He cut asunder bonds that clung; fulfilled
    with His own mercys gift sublime my souls
    Desire; and joined me to His servants feet:
    THIS MIRACLE OF GRACE I KNOW NOT, I ! (32)

    IX. The Imperishable.

    In tangled wilderness of birth supine
    I lay ; like wretched cur diseased I roamed;
    Did as I lusted; dwelt with creatures vile,
    with them complying, satisfied in soul !
    He showed me there His flowery fragrant feet,
    by Hari and by Ayan unattained;
    Th IMPERISHABLE made evn me His own:
    THIS MIRACLE OF GRACE I KNOW NOT, I ! (36)

    X. The Lord Supreme.

    I gave no thought to thronging births and deaths,
    but dwelt on tricks, and wiles, and glancing eyes
    Of maids with wealth of braided tresses fair;
    and thus I lay. The King, our LORD SUPREME,
    His jewelld feet, that traverse all the worlds,
    to me made manifest like clustering blooms;
    He wisdom gave, and made me all His own:
    THIS MIRACLE OF GRACE I KNOW NOT, I ! (40)

    Hymn XLII.- chennip pathu

    THE HEAD-DECAD

    [THE CERTAINTY OF BLISS]
    I. Civan a light.

    The God of gods; the Warrior true; south Perun-turrais Chieftain dear;
    The First; the Blissful One, Whose forn the Three could not attain to know;
    The Flower full-blown of LIGHT is He, to all save to His loving ones, unknown !
    UPON HIS MIGHTY ROSEATE FOOTS PURE FLOWER OUR HEADS SHALL GLEAMING REST ! (4)

    II. Civan the beautiful Sundaran

    The eightfold FORM, the Beautiful, the sweet ambrosial Tide of bliss;
    Most Worthy, Prince, of Civa-world; south Perun-turrais Warrior-king;
    The Beautiful, Who made the Queen with flowing locks part of Himself;
    UPON HI ROSEATE FOOTS FULL-ORBED FLOWER OUR HEADS SHALL BLOOMING REST ! (8)

    III. Loving and gracious.

    Ye maids, the Lord whose eye looked on me sweetly, claiming service due;
    The Warrior-lord, in Perun-turrai girt with cocoa-groves Who dwells;
    Who takes the maidens armlets bright, and claims our soul and service true.
    UPON HIS ROSEATE FOTS EXPANDING FLOWER OUR HEADS SHALL GLEAMING REST ! (12)

    IV. Gracious manifestations.

    With pious men around, Parabaran on earth appeared, a Seer.
    Mid saints made perfect, Civa-Lord dances in Tillais city old.
    Mystic ! He comes, enters our homes, makes us His own, our service claims.
    UPON THE MIGHTY ROSEATE FOOTS FLOWER GIVEN OUR HEADS SHALL BLOOMING REST ! (16)

    V. His disciple.

    He gave the boon that I should not vain joys of life as true regard.
    Partner of Umais grace, He came to sacred Perun-turrais shrine.
    And, while ambrosia flowing filled our frames, showed us His foot, and said Behold !
    UPON THAT MIGHTY ROSEATE FOOTS AUSPICIOUS FLOWER OUR HEADS SHALL REST ! (20)

    VI. He gives an assured hope.

    Our mind He entered, made us His, destroyed ill deeds, and piety
    That saves bestowed, Unto His jewelled foot when wreath of flowers we bring,
    Hell give our souls release; grant to dwell safe beyond this threefold world.
    UPON THAT FATHERS ROSEATE FEET, THOSE FULL-BLOWN FLOWERS, OUR HEADS SHALL REST ! (24)

    VII. Fellowship with His saints.

    That I might swim this sea called birth, great grace in love He gave;
    Caused me released to join the gracious band of saints, and made me of their goodly kin.
    To save me thus the Lord His truth displayed, in greatness of His grace !
    UPON HIS ROSEATE FEET, WHO SHOWED SUCH MIGHT, OUR HEADS SHALL BEAMING REST ! (28)

    VIII. Unfailing Refuge.

    The falsehood of these bodies vile, worm-filled, Thou dost abolish quite,
    Bright Splendour, Ruler, Lord, our Father, evermore they cry, and lift
    Adoring hands; their eyes pure flower with tears oerflows; to these Thy saints
    THY ROSEATE FEET FAIL NOT; UPON THOSE FLOWERS OUR HEADS SHALL FLOWER CROWND REST ! (32)

    IX. Lord of Earth and Heaven.

    Me vainly wandering here Thou badst to come, didst slay the hate of deeds,
    Celestial Lord ! This world Thou dost transcend, Lord of the realms beyond,
    Pleasures of grace shall spring perennial to Thy loving servants true.
    UPON THY ROSEATE FEETS PURE GOLDEN FLOWER OUR HEADS SHALL BEAMING REST ! (36)

    X. All join in His praise.

    The Free,- the Primal Splendour,- Father Triple-eyed-all beings Germ !
    The Perfect,- Lord of Civa-world,- sing, chaunt His name, O men devout !
    Hither draw nigh your bonds to loose ! O bow ye down and worship here !
    UPON THE ROSEATE FOOT, THAT FILLS THE SOUL, OUR HEADS SHALL GLEAMING REST ! (40)

    Hymn XLIII.- tiru varthai

    THE SACRED WORD

    [GRATEFUL LOVE]
    I. The gracious incarnation.

    The Ladys Spouse; of mystic word Proclaimer skilld;
    Light seen mid blooming flowers; the faultless Grace supreme;
    Who to His servants grants the boon of justic bright;
    the King of virtuous excellence Who reigns benign,
    In Perun-turrai girt with fragrant flowery groves;-
    Himself hath come, and on this earth, a gracious Form,
    Descending hath revealed the Primal Deity.
    THAT GRACE WHO KNOW WITH OUR SUPERNAL LORD ARE ONE ! (4)

    II. His condescension.

    Mal, Ayan, and the King of heavenly hosts approached
    and lowly bowed before Him,- Ican gave them grace !-
    Descending to this world, He showed the perfect way
    unto the simple dame that dwelt in Idavai,-
    Where mansions fair arise with goodly splendour bright,
    of sparkling gems, and saints hold converse sweet,-
    Grace of abounding excellence He gave.
    HIS POWER WHO KNOW WITH OUR SUPERNAL LORD ARE ONE ! (8)

    III.

    The crownd Eternal-One,- King of th immortal host,-
    the rapturous Dancer, as the six sects homage pay,
    Ascends the boat, accepts and crowns their service due;
    while heaven and earth adore and praise their King.
    He grants infirmity should die !- In Perun-turrais shrine
    He dwells in mighty grace ! - In love to her, His bride,
    He brought a jewelled net, to catch the mystic fish !
    HIS WAYS WHO KNOW WITH OUR SUPERNAL LORD ARE ONE ! (12)

    IV.

    A woodmans form He bore, on mount Mahendiram
    when sore distressed the suppliants came
    And sought Him, Civan, mighty Lord, was nigh to save !
    That we His servants pondering HIm, should safety win,
    The Teacher on a prancing charer mounted came,-
    of Perun-turrais shrine thEternal Deity,-
    That day His friends from every side He made His own !
    THEY WHO HIS NATURE KNOW OUR SUPERNAL LORD ARE ONE ! (16)

    V.

    He came. The gods in reverence bowed their heads, and praised.
    A sea of mighty mercy,- He in grace brake off
    His servants bonds, and set us free. Our Deity,-
    th Eternal-One of Perun-turrais shrine,- that day
    Himself passed oer the sea, whose surging billows rose;
    His grace He gave within the lofty walls
    Of Lankas home to the soft-fingered captive maid !
    HIS WORTH WHO KNOW WITH OUR SUPERNAL LORD ARE ONE ! (20)

    VI.

    Lord of the bow that wrapt the cities three in flames;-
    a huntsmans guise he took with guard of dogs around;-
    Before Him gathered gods obeying His behests;-
    our mighty Lord, in forest wilds where He abode
    Took pity on the hunted boar ! Ican, that day,-
    our Father, Perun-turrais King, the Eternal Deity,-
    A pig became, wonder unique, and milk bestowed !
    HIS DEEDS WHO KNOW WITH OUR SUPERNAL LORD ARE ONE ! (24)

    VII.

    In their fair garden home mid lotus flowers and hum
    of bees, the maids with beauteous brows assemble round,
    Chaunting bow down, strew full-blown flowers, and praise
    our Ican,- radiant Beam of rosy growing light,-
    Who ever bides in Perun-turrais flowery grove,-
    our Holy-One. To earth He came,- appeared,- destroyed Earth-born diversities,- gave grace. His MIGHT OF LOVE
    WHOVE POWER TO KNOW WITH OUR SUPERNAL LORD ARE ONE ! (28)

    VIII.

    His breast wears garlands of the opening cassia flower;-
    Here, He slew the tiger strong of claw;-
    The partner He of Umai, lovely queen;-
    of Perun-turrai girt with rich groves King;-
    Ican, in great and spotless glory bright;-
    He folds the beauteous ones in soft embrace;-
    He to the vast seas king in fiery form appeard;-
    HIS FORM WHO KNOW SHALL UNION GAIN WITH OUR SUPERNAL LORD ! (32)

    IX.

    Our mighty Lord with pure white ashes decked;-
    Who came Bright Ruler of Mahendiram;-
    Ican, Whose planted foot the gods adore;-
    the southern Ruler, Perun-turrais King;-
    Who loving pity showed to me that day,
    showed me His jewelled foot to melt my soul,
    My sorrows soothed, in grace made me His own !
    HIS DEEDS WHO KNOW WITH OUR SUPERNAL LORED ARE ONE ! (36)

    X.

    The Beauteous-eyed;- the Immortals Lord and ours;-
    Ambrosia to His servants;- Prince Who came
    To earth to loose our mighty bonds, that we
    a bliss unique in earth and heaven might gain;-
    With strong control he sways th ASSEMBLY wise;-
    skilled Leader;- Perun-turrais King;- that day
    To Madura with damsels thronged He came:
    HIS WAYS WHO KNOW SHALL UNION GAIN WITH OUR SUPERNAL LORD ! (40)

    Hymn XLIV.- ennap pathikam

    DEVOUT MUSINGS.

    [JOYOUS EMOTION.]

    -----
    This poem expresses his intense longing to rejoin at once the Master and His disciples.
    -----
    I. Longings for endless joy.

    Would birth in earthly forms might cease, devoted love so might I gain !
    O Civa-Peruman, Whose form is beauteous like red lotus-flower;
    Thou art my rare Ambrosia; midst the assembly of Thy saints
    Thy sacred grace unique show Thou; be gracious, take me too and save !
    (4)

    II. He pleads the promise.

    Im not my own, Thy slave am I; severd from Thee no moment can
    I live; a cur, I nothing know,- O Cankaran!In pitying grace
    Thou Mighty saidst to me, Behold, and showedst Thy jewelld feet. Our Lord,
    And was the promise false that said, I sever nevermore from Thee? (8)

    III. Love that maketh not ashamed.

    Melting my frame, granting Thy grace, showing to me Thy flowry feet,
    Erewhile Thou madest me Thine own, O Sage, O First of sages all !
    My Bliss, Thou didst dissolve my soul, and dost my life consume.
    Grant me Thy love, King of my soul; that so Thy grace from shame may shield ! (12)

    IV. He laments his deadness of soul.

    Of piety Im void, nor bow at vision of Thy golden feet;
    My heart is dead, my lips are seald;- yet cause this birth to cease, our Lord !
    Pearl-like Thou art, gem-like Thou art ! First One, I utter my complaint:
    So oft Ive followd Thee, henceforth apart from Thee I bear not life ! (16)

    V. Spiritual declension.

    I see Thy gracious feet no more, which seeing erst mine eyes were glad;
    Ive ceased to cherish Thee; Ive ceased to utter childlike praise; and thus
    Tanu, my mighty Lord, Im lost; the state, that melting thinks on Thee,
    By meannesses Ive ceasd to know; twere shame to me to see Thee come ! (20)

    VI. Supplication.

    Thee, Lord supreme, with milk-white ash adornd, meeting with grace superne
    Thy servants true,
    Who dost appear, and show the havn of grace,- Thee, glorious Light, I, void
    of righteousness,
    Extol as my Ambrosia, praising Thee,- praise, glorify, invoke with weepings loud !
    Master, thus working in me mightily, in grace O speak, in pity speak ! (24)

    Hymn XLV.- yathirai pathu

    THE PILGRIM-SONG.

    [RAPTURE.]

    -----
    This is our Sages wonderful psalm of the up-going, He commemorates his first visit to Tillai,
    and thence mystically sets forth the souls pilgrimage through the world of sense to union with
    Civan on the silver mountain.
    -----
    I. The setting-forth on the journey.

    Our King with head flowr-wreathd, BHUYANGAN-LORD,
    by mercys swelling flood that all dissolves,
    Commingled ever, like perceptions self,
    within our souls,- O come, hath said in love,
    And made us lowly ones His own ! Come ye
    with one accord; behold, the time hath come;
    Pass we,- falsehood for ever left behind,-
    to enter neath the Masters jewelled feet ! (4)

    II. The pilgrimss preparation of soul.

    Enter no more the juggling senses net !
    BHUYANGANS flowry feet, the mighty Lord,
    Ponder intensely,- other things desire ye not :
    dismiss them, let them go, and pass ye on !
    With joyous smile He, entering this world,
    made us-who were like curs impure- His own,
    As it befits to draw anigh the Lord,
    let each with no weak faltering step move on ! (8)

    III. Earthly ties must be loosed.

    Each to himself be his own kith and kin !
    each to himself be his own law and way !
    For who are WE? what OURS? and what are BONDS?
    illusions all,- let these departing flee !
    And, with the ancient servants of the King,
    taking His sign alone for guiding sign,
    Shake falshood off; go on your happy way,
    unto BHUYANGANS golden foot, - our King ! (12)

    IV. Sober, hopeful assurance.

    All ye His servants whove become,
    put far away each idle sportive thought;
    Seek refuge at the Foot where safety dwells;
    hold fast unto the end the sacred sighn;
    Put off from you this body stained with sin;
    in Civans world Hell surely give us place !
    BHUYANGANS self, Whose Form the ashes wears,
    will grant you entrance neath His flowry feet ! (16)

    V. Faint not, press on !

    Free ye your souls from pains of wrath and lust;
    henceforth the time shall not be long drawn out !
    Beneath our Masters feet with glad acclaim
    that we in one may go, in one combine !
    Even we in Civans town shall refuge find,
    whose flor-wreathd gates to us shall not be closd !
    There enterd we in ecstasy shall sing
    the glories only of BHUYANGAN-KING ! (20)

    VI. Persevere ! The glorious consummation awaits you.

    Praise ye ! Adore ! Bring beauteous flowers !
    BHUYANGANS foot plant ye within your souls !
    Despise adversities of every form !
    Henceforth no hindrance bars your happy way
    To Civans town, that filld with glory shines
    To Civans foot go we to worship there !
    Before the saints that there abide well move,
    and stand in soul-dissolving rapture there ! (24)

    VII. Loiter not, scatter not !

    Let those that bide abide,- abide not we
    in world that not abides. Straight pass we on
    Unto the foot of our BHUYANGAN-KING,
    Whose sacred form is milk with golden hue !
    All ye that loitering stand delay not now !
    Gather in one to march, whereer ye stand !
    Unto the Mighty One access henceforth
    is hard to gain, if ye should loiter now ! (28)

    VIII. The gate opens !

    Ye, with the Lord, in rapture infinite
    conjoind for ever, who have gained to dwell !
    In strong illusion henceforth sink not ye,
    in sooth; nor utter senseless words profane !
    The sacred door where dwells the priceless Gem,
    is opening even now. To Civans town
    Come, move we on, to reach the sacred foot
    of BHUYANGAN, to Mal divine unknown ! (32)

    IX. Anticipate the joys of fruition.

    Ah, think how ye may reach the goal ! Your thoughts
    correct, and duly chastend, ponder this !
    Ye, who are sinking now in loves excess,-
    enjoying, never sated, the ambrosial grace
    Of BHUYANGAN, the Spouse of Her, whose eyes.
    are like the gleaming spear that warrior wields,-
    Joy ye to go to Civans jewelld foot,
    nor wallowing lie ye here in falsehoods mire ! (36)

    X. They enter in !

    Will ye not come this day, and be His own,
    and prostrate fall, and worship, and adore?
    Those lost in wilderment, who would esteem?
    Ye who bewilderd and confounded stand,
    If ye would perfect clearness gain, this do !
    Ye who would gain in this wide realm the grace
    Of sacred BHUYANGAN, of Civa-world
    the King ! Ah, haste ye, hate ye, haste ye on ! (40)

    Hymn XLVI.- tirupadai ezhuchi

    THE SACRED MARCH

    [THE HOLY WAR.]
    I.

    Strike the sounding drum of the Guru, Wielder of wisdoms sword;
    Spread the white canopy over the Guru, Who mounts the charger of heaven;
    Enter and take to you armour of ashes, fragrant, divine;
    Possess we the heavenly fortress, where hosts of illusion come not ! (4)

    II,

    Servants of His,- march on in the van; ye Devout ones,- move on the flanks;
    Ye Sages of power illustrious,- come fill up the swelling ranks;
    Ye Mystics of strength unfailing,- advance and close up the rear:
    We shall rule the heavenly land, no hosts of evil for ever to fear ! (8)

    Hymn XLVII.- tiruvenba

    THE SACRED VENBA

    [THE STATE OF THOSE WHO HAVE ATTAINED.]

    -----
    This purports to have been composed immediately after his return to Perun-turrai, when he was
    hoping for speedy consummation, but felt impatient.
    -----
    I. How shall I endure this state of imperfection?

    What shall I do while twofold deeds fierce flame burns still out,-
    Nor doth the body melt,- nor falsehood fall to dust ?
    In mind no union gained with the Red Firss honey
    The Lord of Perun-turrai fair ! (4)
    II. How employ the weary time of waiting?

    Shall I cry out, or wail, or dance, or sing, or watch?
    O Infinite, what shall I do? The Sire Who fills
    With rapturous amaze,- great Perun-turrais Lord
    Let all with me bending adore ! (8)

    III. The wonder of his conversion.

    No sense of fault had I ! Nor of refreshment knew.
    In safetys path, by worship at His roseate feet.
    He stood on earth, His dart shot forth, and to my thought
    Linked Himself;- Perun-turrais Lord ! (12)

    IV. He came in grace.

    He stood before me, rooting out my twofold deeds,-
    The mighty Ruler Who at last shall cut off birth;
    Lord of the south; in Perun-turrai great in grace,
    Who dwells; Balm of all human woes ! (16)

    V. Praise superfluous.

    To them that know what word can praise the King? - Him, Who
    All worlds brought forth, Whom Vedic god and Mal knew not;
    The mighty Lord, Whose seat is Perun-turrais shrine;-
    In me to-day, and evermore ! (20)

    VI. The bliss of His advent.

    He filled with frenzy; set me free from births; my soul
    With speechless fervours thrilled,- blest Perun-turrais Lord,-
    The Sire in grace exceeding made me His; the balm
    For all my pain; the deathless BLISS ! (24)

    VII. Leading and light.

    He showed the realm where births return no more; He came
    In grace that no requital knows, Ambrosia sating not !
    This is the light diffusd within my thought by Him,
    The Lord of Perun-turrais shrine ! (28)

    VIII. Condescending love.

    Glorious, exalted over all, the Infinite,-
    To me mere slave, lowest of all, Thou hast assigned
    A place in bliss supreme, that none beside have gained or known !
    Great Lord, what can I do for Thee? (32)

    IX. Unparalleled gift.

    The three, the thirty-three, all other gods beside
    See Thee not, Civan, mighty Lord ! Riding the steed
    Hither descending didst Thou come. When at Thy foot
    I lowly bow, bliss thrills my frame ! (36)

    X. Be not afraid to ask of Him.

    Soul, ponder His twain feet Who here made me His own !
    Beg for HIs grace ! Behold, He will give all,- the King
    Who grace bestows,- Whose seat is Perun-turrais shrine,-
    Dwelling ambrosial in my soul ! (40)

    XI. Light and love from His indwelling.

    He hath increased delight, hath darkness banished,
    For aye cut off afflictions clinging bond, and light
    Of love hath given,- the Lord of Perun-turrai great,
    Well pleased to make my heart His home ! (44)

    Hymn XLVIII.- pandaayanan marai

    THE ANCIENT MYSTIC WORD.

    [THE REALITY OF DIVINE GRACE.]
    I. No requital of electing grace.

    The ancient fourfold mystic word draws not anigh His seat;-
    Nor Mal nor Ayan Him have seen; yet me, the most abject,
    By grace He made His servant ! To Gokaris King, my heart,
    Say, is there any just return ? (4)

    II. The great manifestation in Perun-turrai.

    Praise Perun-turrai ! There the King, who on the charger came,
    Abides, and gives a mighty flood of honied sweetness forth,
    By which my souls threefold impurity is swept away;-
    So roots of births wild forest die ! (8)

    III. He assumes many characters to save men.

    In wilds a Hunstsman; in sea He casts a net;
    On land He rides the charger: thus our deeds destroys.
    The fair foot-flower of Perun-turrais Lord praise Thou,
    My heart, that error thus may die ! (12)

    IV. The centre of Worship.

    Householders devout; saints who mighty deeds destroy;-
    Those whom tis meet the world should bow before, and praise;-
    Immortals too in worship circling move, and laud ! O friends,
    In Perun-turrai blest adore ! (16)

    V. Come, see the King.

    To Perun-turrai drawing near; that woes disperse,
    Ponder the King of lofty Gokari; and see
    Him Who with Her whose words are music sweet abides
    In Uttra-koca-mangais shrine ! (20)

    VI. Ever praise the God of Perun-turrai.

    The eyes that see Him there are all a rapture of delight;-
    The saints that cherish Him are freed from mortal birth;-
    The Mighty One, in Perun-turrai dwells for aye;-
    My heart, give Him unstinted praise ! (24)

    VII. Perun-turrai is the saving word.

    This is the purport sole of all men say; all speech
    Surpassing, gem-like word, as flawless jewels sheen !
    Uttring but PERUN-TURRAI, Im from births released;
    That healing foot fixt in my mind ! (28)

    Hymn XLIX.- tirupadai yatchi

    THE MARSHALLING OF THE SACRED HOST.

    [THE CESSATION OF LIFES EXPERIENCES.]

    -----
    It was no easy taks to work out a version of this lyric, the rhythmic beauty of which is very
    remarkable. I have striven, at the risk of sundry irregularities in metre, to imitate the flow of the
    original; but the numberless allusions in a poem, which sums up the whole Caivite idea of the
    blessedness of Civans final manifestation to the emancipated soul, will give the reader trouble,
    if he is at all to enter into its spirit. The metre itself is very unusual, resembling somewhat that
    of the Attys of Catullus, and is much admired by those who use the poem in their temple service.
    My rendering is, I believe, strictly and almost literally exact; but it differs in some respects from the
    Tamil paraphrases. The intense mystic fervour of the song must take itself felt !
    -----
    I. His appearing.

    Eyes the twain His jewelld Feet beholding shall be glad;- SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Joy amid joys of damsels beautiful shall cease to lure;- SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The round of birth in earthly worlds shall in oblivion pass; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Twin flowry Feet that Mal knew not adoring shall we bow; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    To sing with gladsome melody, and dance our endless task; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The warriors of the fair Pandi-lands Lord we shall sing; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The mystic change for which the heavns are glad will come; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    If He who cast the net-the Woodman,- come, in grace made manifest to me? (8)

    II.

    One with one, and five with five,- the life shall last; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Thy servants servants servants made, we shall be free; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The Mother thinks on her young, and rising hastes; so shall He come; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The casual qualities that no beginning own shall fill the thought; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    At this is good, and this is ill, no more shall trembling shake; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    We too to join Thy saints above shall onward pass; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Th Ambrosia supreme that fills my loving thought we then shall gain; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    If the bulls Lord, my Master, Whose I am, within my soul shall entering come? (16)

    III.

    Bonds, changes, qualities, all loosd and cast aside shall fall away; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Within my mind, erewhile with fancies filld Ambrosia supreme shall flow; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The Endless, Indivisible shall in us dwell; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The heavnly Light, from endless days supreme shall then appear; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The pains from silly ones with crimson lips shall be dispelld; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The sparkling eyes His sacred form shall then embrace; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Sorrow of grief-ful birth, that from illusions springs, shall all depart; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    If I can, my own loving Lord, in presence meet me here? (24)

    IV.

    The bliss to rest within His lovd embrace shall we enjoy; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    In mercys vast and boundless sea sweetly this day shall we disport; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The mystic music of the beauteous gems, within my soul shall thrilling sound; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The sacred ashes that the Lord for aye adorn shall we approach; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Mid steadfast loving ones foremost in service there shall I abide; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The flowry Feet, to even the mystic scrolls unknown, shall we adore; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The sweet red water-lily Flower my head shall crown; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    If Peruman, the gracious, -Ican, He Who owns, arise to visit me ? (32)

    V.

    Fond fancies all, that valued earths illusions vain, shall cease; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Before the flowry Foot to heavenly ones unknown well bow; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The perturbations all from blindness sprung shall cease; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The mind of loving saints this day shall greatly joy; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Entanglement of sex diverse, and self shall now be loosd; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    States manifold, their very names unknown, wellscape; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Innumerous mystic powers my soul shall then possess; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    If Peruman, the gracious Ican, He who owns, arise to visit me? (40)

    VI.

    The ashes white upon His sacred golden form all beauteous shine; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    A rain of flowers adoring hands of mighty saints shall shower; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The hearts intent of damsels bright with slender form shall then appear; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The sounds from smitten lyre that rise shall multiply delights; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    His servants feet upon my head shall flourish then; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Himself to set His servants free shall forthwith come; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Sweet instruments of music duleet strains shall everywhere rehearse; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    If Ican, Whose of old I am, my Sire, in grace arise to visit me (48)

    VII.

    The pure gems wordless music then shall rapture yield; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The light that hides within my soul sudden shall rise and burn; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    That manifold phenomena may cease the Deity shall come; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Experiences divine unknown before shall unfolding rise; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Distraction caused by those whose lovely brows are bows shall cease this day; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The Essence excellent that even heavenly ones know not shall be with us; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The eightfold qualities that know no bound shall we attain; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    If He, Whose crest the crescent moon adorns, to make us His in grace arise? (56)

    VIII.

    From shell that music breathes the sounds shall then burst forth; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The qualities that quit not earthborn race shall fret no more; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Delusion that declares this good, or that, shall all die down; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    Our whole desire shall ask to serve His servants neath His feet; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The thought of damsels bright of eye shall then rejoice; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The bliss of Civan shared by glorious saints we then shall know; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    The heavenly all-pervasive Light Ambrosial shall we gain; -SHALL IT NOT BE?
    If He, the endless Vedic Lord, to make me His in grace arise (64)

    Hymn L.- Aananda malai

    THE GARLAND OF RAPTURE.

    [DESIRE OF THE EXPERIENCE OF CIVAN.]
    I. How may I join my friends beyond?

    Th Immortals all have gained Thy flower-like feet,
    bright as the lightnings glance;- have crossed
    The worlds wide sea, and bearing golden flowers
    they praise ! Reveal in love, I pray,-
    Thou Refuge of the stony worthless heart,
    how one like me,- distressed,- cast off,-
    Sunk in the sea of fond desire,- at length,
    how many I come to Thee? (4)

    II. Have pity on my lonely grief!

    Thou gavst the station blest I knew not of;
    but I knew not Thy grace,- was lost !
    Master, no failure is in Thee at ail;
    Who comes to aid Thy slave? I cry !
    Not joined with Thine own ancient saints,-
    who serve and praise Thee many a day,
    My Leader loved, here left behind I stay;-
    Thou seest my lonely pain ! (8)

    III. I am His - when shall I join Him?

    Of virtue void, of penitential grace
    devoid, undisciplined, untaught,-
    As leathern puppet danced about, giddy,
    I whirling fell, lay prostrate there !
    He showed me wondrous things; He showed the way
    to pass to worlds not reached before;
    The raft He showd : when shall I come, a wretch.
    to Him Who made me His ? (12)

    IV. Am I rightfully abandoned?

    I perish, as to perish is my doom;
    the blame, Imperishable One,
    Thou tak;st; and, if to suffering doomed, I bear
    my destined woes, what is the gain?
    O Guru-Gem, Who dost defend and rule,-
    that I sink not in cruel hell;
    Ist good, our Leader lovd, that Thou withdraw,
    and stand not in the midst? (16)

    V. Is there no pity?

    Thou Who dost cherish men like mother dear,-
    uncherishd, left, a weakling here,-
    And must I perish, I a cur ! In love
    henceforth Thy goodness show to me !
    Ive called Thee hast no grace for me,
    but now Thou hast no grace for me,-
    Vile me, whom Thou mid saints didst make Thine own !
    Im he ! Shouldst Thou not save ? (20)

    VI. I claim Thy consolation.

    O King, shouldst Thou not show Thy grace?
    I, wretched, lie at ruins door.
    And, if Thou bid me not to come to Thee,
    who is there here to calm my fears?
    Are they whore doomed to die, my fellows all?
    This is unmeet, will not men say?
    O God, Dancer in Tillais hall, I tremble,
    henceforth comfort me ! (24)

    VII. I sink powerless before Thee.

    Thou madst the jackal be a charger fleet !
    Didst work enchantments manifold !
    The mighty SOuth Kings Madura Thou filldst
    with madness, Perun-turrais Lord !
    O Being hard to reach ! O Avanacis Sire !
    The Pandi kingdoms rushing flood !
    O Splendour, infinite, unknown, in sooth
    I know not aught to do ! (28)

    Hymn LI.- achchop pathikam

    THE WONDER OF SALVATION.

    [ENJOYMENT INEFFABLE.]

    -----
    This hymn was composed after he had settled down in Tillai, his active life finished, and
    was waiting for the great release. He surveys, as he was so fond of doing, the whole course along
    which his Master had guided him; acknowledges how often he had fallen through an undisciplined
    and unpurified mind; and records with thankfulness that grace him the victory at last. No rapture is
    like his! Each verse addresses his Master variously as (1) Father, (2) the Mystic Dancer, (3) the
    Guru, (4) the High and Lofty One, (5) the Master, (6) the Blissful, (7) again as the Guru, (8) the
    Author of all things, and (9) the Mother (being one with Umai).
    -----
    I. The Fathers converting grace.

    To me, who toiled and moiled mid fools, that knew not WAY of final peace,
    He taught the WAY of pious love;- and that old deeds might cease and flee,
    Purging the foulness of my will, made me pure bliss, took for His own;-
    Twas thus the FATHER gave me grace: O RAPTURE ! WHO SO BLEST AS I ? (4)

    II. The mystic Dancer converts the heretic.

    A WAY that was no rightful WAY I followed, deeming it the WAY,-
    That I might seek no meaner WAY, but only seek HIS sacred grace
    To gain, - He, Whom no signs describe, His mystic DANCE has given to know !
    Twas thus the DANCER gave me grace: O RAPTURE ! WHO SO BLEST AS I ? (8)

    III. The Teacher leads and guards in the way of truth.

    Me trusting every lie as truth, - plunged in desire of womens charms,-
    He guarded that I perished not with soul perturbd,- the Lord Superne,
    On whose left side the Lady dwells ! He brought me nigh His jewelld feet,-
    Twas thus my GURU gave me grace: O RAPTURE ! WHO SO BLEST AS I ? (12)

    IV. The Lofty One purifies by discipleship.

    To me, - born in this clay, and doomd, oerworn, to perish, and to fall, -
    Love inconceivable He gave;- made me His own;- caused me to wear
    His own perfumed ashes white;- that I the way of purity
    Should reach, the LOFTY gave me grce: O RAPTURE ! WHO SO BLEST AS I ? (16)

    V. The Master relieved my soul of its fear.

    Afflicted sore by glancing eyes of silly damsels, soft of foot,-
    I stood, my mind by sorrow pierced; and then Thy grace I gaind,- was savd,-
    Evn I, O MASTER mine ! Thou badst Thy servant come; Fear not, Thou saidst !
    Twas thus that grace to me was given: O RAPTURE ! WHO SO BLEST AS I ? (20)

    VI. The Last-One saved me from sensual servitude.

    Birth of this frame that burns and falls I took for true,- did many deeds;
    In converse joyd with maidens wreathed in flowers, with lustrous armlets deckd.
    My bonds He cut, made me His own, cleansed foulness so no trace was left !
    Twas thus the LAST-ONE gave me grace: O RAPTURE ! WHO SO BLEST AS I ? (24)

    VII. The Gurus esoteric teaching.

    Prostrate it was my fate to fall in wilderment of fair ones charms.
    In gentle love He led me forth, loosing the prison bars of bond;
    Showed me the way to scape; and taught the meaning of the mystic OM
    Twas thus the GURU gave me grace: O RAPTURE ! WHO SO BLEST AS I ? (28)

    VIII. The First saved me by gift of personal devotion.

    My troubled soul was whirled around in circling tide of death and birth;
    I fell, enamoured with the charms of those with jewels rare adorned;
    The Lord, whose Form the Lady shares, in mercy drew me to His feet.
    Twas thus the FIRST-ONE gave me grace: O RAPTURE ! WHO SO BLEST AS I ? (32)

    IX. Saves me with a Mothers love.

    With those that knew not right or good,- men ignorant,- I wandered too.
    The First, the Primal Lord Himself threefold pollution causd to cease;
    Even me He took as something worth,- like dog in sumptuous litter borne !
    Twas thus the MOTHER gave me grace: O RAPTURE ! WHO SO BLEST AS I ? (36)